Baseball legends gather to help needy

SYLVIA BADGER

July 01, 1992|By SYLVIA BADGER

Baseball reigned supreme in Baltimore last weekend when legends of the game held forth at the Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association's annual meeting at the Marriott Inner Harbor.

The organization was founded 10 years ago by players Brooks Robinson, Billy Hunter, Chuck Hinton, Dick Bosman and Jim Hannan to help less fortunate players. The goals have since expanded and the group travels around the country sponsoring events to help needy players as well as other charities.

Robinson, president of the players group, was honored at a black-tie dinner for his role as a founding member and current president. Others in town for the dinner and golf tourney at Turf Valley Country Club were Harmon Killebrew, Boog Powell, Dave McNally, Paul Blair, Fergie Jenkins, Bob Feller, Robin Roberts, Earl Weaver, Sparky Lyle and some of the current Orioles.

Mike Schmidt, former Phillies third baseman who rarely makes appearances, drove to Baltimore because of his longtime admiration for Robinson. And former Phillies relief pitcher Tug McGraw livened up the dinner group when he arrived in a short-sleeved tux jacket with short pants, a loud tie and an attitude that said, "if the suit fits, don't worry about it, wear it."

There's no final tally on how much money was raised, but we do know the live auction brought in $10,000 at the Saturday dinner. Jim Stankovic, president of J. Schoeneman, makers of Burberry coats and the title sponsor for the golf tourney, spent about $4,000 for sports memorabilia. Stankovic also presented Robinson with a Golden Bale suit, similar to one he donated to the New York Opera Guild, which it auctioned for $3,200.

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For three years Paul Jan Zdunek, the founding director of the Young Artists Concert Series, brought the music of talented young artists to our attention. So he will be missed when he moves to Cleveland in the fall to begin work on his master's degree program in orchestral conducting at the Cleveland Institute of Music.

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Mayor Kurt Schmoke, wife Patricia, and their daughter, Kathy, are set for dad's working vacation next week in England and Wales. Schmoke, certainly Britain's darling of mayors, was invited by Professor Robin Hambleton, University of Cardiff, to speak on urban regeneration at the 21st Century Trust. The trust was created by Sir David Wills to let younger people examine issues confronting policy makers through the end of the 20th and beginning of the 21st century.

The Schmokes' schedule will take them to Balliol College at Oxford, Schmoke's alma mater; dinner with SCM chemical company officials and members of Parliament; Scotland Yard; a two-day visit to Wales, where they will stay at the mansion house with the Lord Mayor of Cardiff and attend a dinner for one of Wales favorite citizens, Anthony Hopkins.

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Tune in to Maryland Public Television at 9 tonight for the documentary on the life of "Huey Long," which was made by one of Baltimore's own. Nope, not Levinson, but Richard Kilberg, Pikesville High grad. (His father, Albert, is a member of the Maryland Public Broadcasting Commission.) Richard co-produced "Huey Long" with Ken Burns of "Civil War"-fame.

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Party alert: It's time to begin work on a fall social calendar and I need your input. If you have set dates for fall fund-raising galas or just fun events and would like them listed in my Labor Day

column, please send the information to me at 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278, or fax it to my attention, (410) 783-2519. I can't promise that everything sent in will be used, but it will certainly be considered. Thanks.

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