Suspect, 15, surrenders in slaying of 3-year-old

June 30, 1992|By Michael James | Michael James,Staff Writer

Accompanied by his mother and grandmother, a 15-year-old boy ended the five-day search for him last night when he walked into Baltimore's Eastern District police station to face charges of killing a 3-year-old boy Wednesday.

Rudolph Horton Jr., who lives in the 900 block of N. Montford Ave., surrendered at 7:45 p.m. -- after having a brief talk with his grandmother.

He was charged as an adult with first-degree murder in the death of Andre Antonio Dorsey, who police say was struck by stray gunfire in front of his family's rowhouse in the 900 block of E. Biddle St.

"He called me and said he was going in, and he wanted me to go in with him," said young Horton's 60-year-old grandmother, Lena Staton.

"Me and his mother met him out on the corner near my house. He was very scared, but glad to see us," Ms. Staton said. "He said to me, 'Grandma, I'm ready to go.' "

The boy did not say where he had been for the past five days, said Ms. Staton, who lives in the 1100 block of Harford Road.

Police said young Horton on Wednesday evening had recognized a man leaving a liquor store at East Biddle and Wilcox streets as a person who had robbed him a few days earlier. The teen-ager began pursuing the man, then allegedly fired two shots, police said.

Both shots missed the man young Horton was chasing.

As the Dorsey child attempted to scurry up the front steps of his house, he was struck in the back by the second shot, according to police.

The child died shortly after arrival at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Ms. Staton said her grandson, who attended Robert Poole Middle School, was very nervous and apprehensive about surrendering.

Young Horton told his grandmother that he fired the shots "because someone was shooting at him," she said. "I feel just terrible about all of this, and so does he. I wish it had never happened. It's just awful."

Police had been searching for the boy since the night of the shooting, and went to more than one dozen addresses looking for him.

Ms. Staton described her grandson, who lives with his parents, as a "basically good kid. He don't give me no trouble."

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