Death target sues 2 plotters for $52 million Man names his own wife and Pikesville merchant

June 20, 1992|By Meredith Schlow and Glenn Small | Meredith Schlow and Glenn Small,Staff Writers

A Randallstown man whose wife sought to have him murdered has filed a $52 million suit against her and the Pikesville businessman with whom she conspired.

The suit, filed this week in Baltimore County on behalf of Louis Arnold Lolli, 55, seeks $2 million in compensatory damages and $50 million in punitive damages for the "severe and extreme emotional distress" caused by the murder plot.

Mr. Lolli's wife of 28 years, Nancy Anna Lolli, 48, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit murder and received a nine-year suspended sentence in Howard County Circuit Court last month.

Her accomplice, Manual S. Fram, 59, the owner of a local tombstone company, is serving an 18-month sentence for his part in the murder plot. He pleaded guilty last summer.

"It's probably the most outrageous conspiracy case I've ever seen in my entire life," said L. Robert Evans, Mr. Lolli's lawyer. "It's like a TV story."

Mr. and Mrs. Lolli are separated, but not divorced, said Mr. Evans.

Mr. Fram, of the 6200 block of Park Heights Ave. and president of Fram Monument Co., is in the Howard County Detention Center and could not be reached for comment. Nancy Lolli did not wish to comment on the suit.

According to the suit, Mr. Fram in January 1991 paid $10,000 to an undercover state police investigator posing as a killer for hire.

The trooper was to kill Mr. Lolli and crush his body in the trunk of his car.

Nancy Lolli, who still lives in the marital home in the 3700 block of Trent Road, avoided a jail sentence last month. Judge Cornelius F. Sybert Jr. placed her on supervised probation for five years and ordered her to perform 400 hours of community service.

The suit also contends that she took money from the couple's joint bank accounts and put it into bank accounts she shared with Mr. Fram.

Mr. Lolli, the suit alleges, continues to suffer "severe mental anguish, medical and other related expenses, and loss of income."

"There was a person out there, planning his death," said Mr. Evans. "If I were him, I'd be looking over my shoulder. . . . He's been miserable."

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