Travel games keep kids busy

New products

June 17, 1992|By Linda Shrieves | Linda Shrieves,Orlando Sentinel

With summer coming, you might be ready to pack up the kids and head for the mountains for a quiet, stress-free vacation.

Just one problem. How will you keep the little ones entertained for that glorious 10-hour trip?

The dreaded license-plate game?

The antiquated travel checkers set?

We don't think so.

Just in time, Mattel has come up with three new travel games that might appease the little ones -- at least until the next rest stop.

Kids ages 7 and up probably will like Travel UNO, which is simply a smaller version of the traditional UNO game. Note to parents: This should come with a pair of earplugs for you, because players frequently will be screaming "UNO!"

For a quieter ride, give the younger kids (ages 3 and up) three Sesame Street Travel Games: the I Remember alphabet game, the How Many? counting game, and Mix and Match, a puzzle game. Each game comes in a plastic carrying case.

And for kids 5 and older who are infatuated with the craze started by the Where's Waldo? books, there's now a travel game. Children are supposed to be the first to spot Waldo so they can collect the most Waldo cards. (Probably lots of yelling here, too.)

The games sell for about $7 each.

*

And now, let's talk about what to buy dad for Father's Day:

If Dad has been eyeballing those new electronic personal planners, but he's not quite ready to make the leap to a completely electronic system, he might be the perfect candidate for Rolodex's new personal planner.

This planner has an electronic memory that will keep up to 400 names, numbers and addresses on file. It also has a handy calculator function.

In addition, it comes with a paper calendar for writing down appointments and making to-do lists.

The planner has a place for storing business cards and expense account receipts.

The Personal Planner, which is the size of a checkbook, sells for $130 and will be available at department stores and office stationery stores.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.