Baha'is marking an anniversaryBaha'is of the Baltimore...

Religion Notes

May 28, 1992

Baha'is marking an anniversary

Baha'is of the Baltimore region will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the passing of their founder, a day they call his ascension, with a talk tonight introducing the faith to the public, offering the Baha'i faith as a solution to racial divisions.

"We're the faith community that's been practicing race unity for 150 years," said Lisa Bautista, an organizer of the event. "Our goal is to unite the whole world."

The Baha'i faith originated with the prophet Baha'u'llah in 19th century Persia proclaiming a human unity and equality in God. The faith has no clergy, but its missionary efforts have drawn people of many races. Baha'is claim 5 million adherents worldwide, about 250 in the Baltimore area.

The ascension of Baha'u'llah is a holy day for Baha'is, one they celebrate with prayers, devotions and songs until 4 a.m., which was the time of the prophet's passing. Ms. Bautista said she didn't expect guests from the general public to stay that late.

The program begins tonight at 9 p.m. at the Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel, 300 S. Charles St.

Jerusalem Day:

Giora Feidman, a world famous klezmer clarinetist with the Israeli Philharmonic and several speakers will lead a celebration tonight of the 25th anniversary of the reunification of Jerusalem under Jewish authority. The event, sponsored by the Zionist Organization of America, is one of several going on across the country. Jerusalem had been divided between Jordan and Israel before Israeli troops captured East Jerusalem during the Six-Day War of 1967.

Baltimore Jewish leaders, Israeli diplomats and other dignitaries will speak. The festivities begin tonight at 7:45 at Beth El 'N Congregation, in the 8100 block of Park Heights Ave.

Christian Business:

The owners of Holland National Associates, a Baltimore water and air filtration company, are putting on a National Christian Business Exposition Saturday. Michelle Holland, chairwoman of the event, said she decided to organize the trade fair after attending many others, such as Black Expo, for Christians in business.

A Christian business, she says, is simply a business "owned by a Christian." The event provides an opportunity for businesses to display their products, do public relations and recruit potential employees. There will be seminars on Christian business ethics under such headings as "Socioeconomics and the Word of God."

The exposition will be held Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Ramada Hotel, in the 1700 block of Belmont Ave., across from the Security Square Mall.

Religion and Science:

Loyola College's annual conference on the relationship between religion and science will deal with the theme "God and the Physical Universe." It will feature two lecturers sponsored by the Templeton Foundation, which awards annual prizes for progress in religion.

The Rev. Arthur Peacock, an Anglican theologian from Oxford University, will talk about "God's Interaction With a 'Chaotic' World" at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow and at 10:30 a.m. Saturday.

Karl Schmitz-Moorman, a professor of philosophy and theology at the University of Bochum in Germany, will talk about "Redemption in an Evolutionary World" on at 1:30 p.m. Saturday. The lectures will be held in the McManus Theater at Loyola.

The event is free and open to the public.

Send religious news items -- about events, local personalities, etc. -- to Religion Notes, c/o Jay Merwin, The Evening Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278.

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