Teachers and new testsThe Maryland State Teachers...

It's your call

May 26, 1992

Teachers and new tests

The Maryland State Teachers Association is criticizing new state standardized tests intended to measure how children apply what they learn in school to real life. So flawed are the new tests, the MSTA asserts, that students' scores, which have been generally low, should be thrown out. The MSTA found especially offensive a question giving fifth-graders an option to write about the constitutionality of nude dancing. A state education spokesman didn't deny that some problems exist, but added: "We're really encouraged to keep moving forward." The Evening Sun would like to know what you think. Of what you've heard, read or perhaps know through the experiences of participants, are these new tests likely to produce an improved snapshot of public schools' effectiveness? Is the subject of nude dancing appropriate in a question aimed at fifth-graders?

To register your opinion, call SUNDIAL at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County). After you hear the greeting, you'll be asked to punch in a four-digit code on your touch-tone phone. Punch 4600 and you'll be connected with "It's Your Call," The Evening Sun's phone survey on topical issues.

Look for the results in tomorrow's Evening Sun.

"It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as a scientific public opinion poll would be.

Brown vs. Quayle

Most callers to SUNDIAL sympathize with Vice President Dan Quayle in his criticism of the values epitomized by TV character Murphy Brown, a successful career woman who chose to have a child out of wedlock. Of 1,385 callers, 981, or nearly 71 percent, say Mr. Quayle is right, while 404, or 29 percent, say Ms. Brown is right.

However, 738 of 1,337 callers (55 percent) say unwed motherhood is acceptable in certain situations, while 599 (44 percent) say it is not acceptable.

"It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as a scientific public opinion poll would be.

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