Top seed falls in duckpin tourney final

May 25, 1992|By Glenn Small | Glenn Small,Staff Writer

Top seed Kenny Herrell apparently couldn't wait for the final of the Miller Lite Open duckpin tournament last night, and it may have cost him the title.

Herrell, of Silver Spring, had to wait all day before bowling in the final while lower seeds competed for the right to face him. When his turn came, he lost to second seed Eddie Darling of Laurel, 131-105, at Greenway Bowl East in Moravia Park.

Darling struck in the eighth frame and marked in the 10th to close out the match.

"It feels great," said Darling, who earned $2,200 for first place. It was his fourth professional duckpin title, tying him for seventh place on the all-time victory list.

Herrell, 32, averaged 148 in winning four of five games Saturday to earn the top seed in the two-day tournament.

But that strong showing might have hurt him yesterday, when he had a long wait before he could go for the title.

"I was tight the first few frames," said Herrell. "I was sitting around for seven hours."

In the semifinal, Darling, 35, struck three times in the ninth and 10th frames to beat Bill Honeycutt of Baltimore, 156-131.

Herrell won $1,100, Honeycutt $650.

In the women's competition, Pat Loomis of Overlea rolled three strikes in the 10th frame of the final to post a 148-125 victory over Lynne Heller, 30, of Belcamp.

Loomis, 37, won $1,200. A pro duckpin bowler for 16 years, Loomis said she was so focused on her game she wasn't sure what the score was. "I didn't have a clue. . . . It was close up to the end," she said.

It was the first tournament title for Loomis since 1981, and it was meaningful in another way. Last year, she was sidelined for 16 weeks after she underwent surgery to repair nerve damage in her throwing elbow.

Steve Shortridge of Baltimore and David Noyes of Manchester, in Carroll County, tied for tournament high game with a 208.

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