Herb Alpert creates abstract paintings too

COLLECTIBLES

May 24, 1992|By Anita Gold | Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune

Q: My husband collects Herb Alpert recordings. I recently heard that Alpert is also a painter. Are his paintings for sale? If so, where?

A: Herb Alpert began painting in the early 1970s and quickly became enraptured with the abstract forms and bold colors he created on canvas. Mr. Alpert's works are influenced by music, and canvases with titles such as "Birdland" and "Fly Me to the Moon" are available with a catalog of his works for $18 postage paid from Wenger Gallery, 638 1/2 N. Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Q: How can I find out the value of some old Kodak cameras?

A: "The Hove International Blue Book 1992-1993 Illustrated Guide With Prices For Classic and Collectible Cameras" has descriptions and prices for more than 200 Kodak cameras from $5 to $750. It's $42.95 postage paid from Wallace-Homestead Book Co., One Chilton Way, Radnor, Pa. 19089-0230; phone (800) 695-1214.

Q: Where can I get cassettes of 78 rpm recordings? Also, where can I find lists of 78 records and their values?

A: Send a list of the 78s you wish to have recorded professionally on a cassette tape (up to 20 a tape) to the House of Music, in care of George Silha, 2057 W. 95th St., Chicago, Ill. 60643; phone (312) 239-4114. Each tape is $35 postage paid. Mr. Silha also offers a free search service for records and tapes and publishes a monthly newsletter for $10 a year, or send $1 for a current issue. The fourth edition of the "American Premium Record Guide -- 1900-1965," by Les Docks, lists 78s, 45s and LPs and is available for $25.45 postage paid from Books Americana, Box 2326, Florence, Ala. 35630.

Q: How can I check out the value of an old guitar?

A: Send a description or photo of the guitar to Russ Swanson, in care of the American Guitar Collectors Association, 1477 Applegate Drive, Naperville, Ill. 60565. Enclose an addressed, stamped envelope for a reply.

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