Lil E. Tee draws a favorable No. 9 post Dance Floor gets poor 14th position for Saturday's richest-ever Preakness.

May 14, 1992|By Kent Baker | Kent Baker,Staff Writer

Kentucky Derby winner Lil E. Tee secured a favorable spot, but Dance Floor got the worst of it this morning in the post position draw for the 117th Preakness Saturday.

Lil E. Tee, rated the favorite at 7-2 in the early line, will break from the No. 9 slot as he tries to capture the second leg of the Triple Crown.

"I think that's good. I'm pleased with it," said trainer Lynn Whiting. "The speed is on the outside and a couple horses have good shots because of that."

With Alydeed and Speakerphone, the expected pace-setters, breaking from No. 12 and 13, respectively, the task becomes even more difficult for Dance Floor, the third-place finisher in the Derby who will start on the extreme outside.

"This definitely compromises our chance to win the race," said the unhappy trainer of Dance Floor, D. Wayne Lukas. "I don't think anyone wants [post] 14 and I think it hurts us as much as anyone.

"I don't like it at all. Let's do it over."

Dance Floor ran a strong race in the Derby after breaking from the No. 16 post. He got to the lead by the half-mile pole and gamely held on for third.

The Preakness inside post went to Agincourt, the Nick Zito-trained charge, who usually lays just off the pace.

"It's better than 14," said Mr. Zito.

Casual Lies, second in the Derby, will start from the middle at No. 8, and Conte di Savoya, fourth at Louisville, was assigned No. 3.

Fourteen horses drew into the field for the first time in 22 years. The result is the richest Preakness ever, with a gross purse of $744,800.

Preakness post positions

1. Agincourt

2. Technology

3. Conte Di Savoya

4. Pine Bluff

5. Big Sur

6. Careful Gesture

7. My Luck Runs North

8. Casual Lies

9. Lil E. Tee

10. Dash For Dotty

11. Fortune's Gone

12. Alydeed

13. Speakerphone

14. Dance Floor

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.