The opening of Oriole Park at Camden Yards has spawned a...

salmagundi

May 13, 1992

The opening of Oriole Park at Camden Yards has spawned a new generation of up-from-the-rotting-wharves (UFTRW) stories in national and regional magazines and newspapers.

UFTRW's -- stories that describe Baltimore's renaissance and note, usually near the top, that the Inner Harbor used to be honeycombed with rotting wharves -- were ubiquitous in the years after Harborplace's completion and the opening of the National Aquarium. In recent years UFTRW's had gone the way of the five-cent cigar.

My, how they're back! The one city tourism officials should like best is in the April issue of Mid-Atlantic Country magazine. Titled "Diamonds on the Patapsco," the article by Brooke C. Stoddard combines the new stadium and Inner Harbor development in a glittering package that breathes not a discouraging word about the Queen City of the Patapsco Drainage Basin. Indeed, the article concludes:

"Even if Washington dollars (in the form of federal support for cities) are harder to come by these days, Baltimore is ready to welcome Washington residents, whose patronage will translate into dollars anyhow. The way this city sees it, that kind of traffic and that kind of tourism can only add more fuel to Baltimore's second renaissance."

The color photography accompanying the article is spectacular: a nighttime panorama of the downtown skyline, an aerial view of the piers along the Inner Harbor and, of course, Baltimore's most European pose -- Fells Point ("colorful, cobblestoned") from the water.

Welcome back, UFTRW's!

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