Gordon C. Murray, Baltimore lawyer for 39 yearsGordon...

Obituaries

May 12, 1992

Gordon C. Murray, Baltimore lawyer for 39 years

Gordon Cumming Murray, a Baltimore attorney for 39 years, died Saturday of emphysema at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 66.

A memorial service will be held at 5 p.m. tomorrow at Second Presbyterian Church, 4200 St. Paul St.

Born in Baltimore, Mr. Murray was the son of the late J. Edward and Norma Cumming Murray. A graduate of the Calvert School, he attended the McDonogh School and graduated from Fishburne Military Academy in Waynesboro, Va.

In World War II, Mr. Murray served with the Army's 10th Armored Division in Europe.

After the war, he completed his education at the College of William and Mary and the William and Mary School of Law.

Mr. Murray began his law practice in Baltimore as a trademark attorney with Samuels & Clark. Subsequently he was associated with the law firms of Bartlett, Poe & Claggett, and White, Page & Lentz.

In 1962, he went into private practice specializing in contract, insurance and surety law -- work that took him to many parts of the United States.

Mr. Murray was a member of the American Bar Association, serving on the Fidelity, Surety Committee, the Maryland State Bar and the Baltimore Bar. He was a member of the Merchants Club and the Hunt Valley Golf Club, and made his home in the Poplar Hill section of North Baltimore.

Music was Mr. Murray's hobby. In his youth he had studied at the Peabody Preparatory. An accomplished jazz pianist, he also played trumpet and drums.

Surviving are his wife, Nancy Wilhelm Murray; three children from a previous marriage,) who are a son, Gordon S. Murray of Hillsboro, Calif., and two daughters, Norma Murray Iglehart and Gillian Murray Koerber, both of Baltimore; a brother, Edward E. Murray, and a sister, Flora M. Wallace, both of Baltimore; and five grandchildren.

Evelyn L. Campbell

Public relations director

Services for Evelyn Louise Campbell, director of community affairs for Baltimore's Health Department, will be held at 11:30 a.m. today at Enon Baptist Church, Edmondson Avenue and Schroeder Street.

Ms. Campbell, who was 62 and lived on Winston Avenue, died Tuesday at Mercy Medical Center after a heart attack.

For nearly 10 years before joining the staff of the city's Health Department in 1983, she was director of public relations for the East Baltimore Community Corp.

Born in Baltimore, the former Evelyn Louise Lee was reared here and in Richmond, Va. She was a graduate of Virginia State College.

She twice worked for the state of Maryland, from 1952 to 1956 as a claims examiner for the state's employment service and from 1965 to 1973 as director of food service at Crownsville State Hospital.

She held a number of radio and public relations jobs. In the late 1950s she did handled public relations and a news program on WEBB-AM for the American Brewery. She also handled public relations for singer Sam Cooke before being a host on "Speak to Me," a talk show on WCBM-AM from 1962 to 1965.

She was a member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Democratic Women's League, the Eastside Democratic Organization and broadcasting and public relations groups that included the National Public Relations Council and the Women Broadcasters of America.

She is survived by her parents, David S. and Emily Lee of Baltimore; a son, Edwin S. Johnson of Baltimore; four grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.

Rev. J. F. Kresslein

Redemptorist priest

A Mass of the Resurrection for the Rev. John F. Kresslein, C.S.S.R., a Redemptorist priest for 47 years that included 27 in the Caribbean, will be held at 11 a.m. today at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Roman Catholic Church, 4795 Ilchester Road, Ilchester, where he had been on the staff since 1990.

Father Kresslein, 75, died Saturday at the University of Maryland Medical Center of complications from cancer.

Born in Highlandtown, he was ordained in 1945. He spent the next 27 years as a missionary in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

Although based in various parishes there, his work included ministering to the poor in rural areas where priests were rarely present. Part of his work was to assist such people by setting up community self-help programs.

He returned to Maryland in 1972 as associate pastor at St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church in Annapolis and began more than a decade of service in parishes in the Annapolis-Baltimore area.

In 1974, he was appointed pastor of St. Joseph's in Odenton and helped the parish build a new church. He spent seven years there before being assigned in 1982 as associate pastor of St. Michael's on South Wolfe Street in East Baltimore.

From there, the priesthood took him to Pennsylvania Dutch country in south-central Pennsylvania. He was assigned first to St. Clement's in Ephrata, Pa., and in 1984 to St. James in Lititz, Pa., which he served for six years.

He kept in close touch over the years with friends from the many congregations he served, including those in Puerto Rico. Throughout his life, he enjoyed gardening.

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