Grandmother claims lost totA 3-year-old boy found alone...

MARYLAND NEWSWATCH

May 11, 1992

MARYLAND STATE — Grandmother claims lost tot

A 3-year-old boy found alone and crying in a Roy Rogers restaurant in Essex was claimed by his grandmother early today, 15 hours after the child was abandoned by his mother in an apparent spell of "confusion," police said.

The grandmother, Joy Herndon of Lanham, filed a missing person report with Prince George's County police, who notified Baltimore County authorities after learning the child had been found.

Mrs. Herndon claimed her grandson, James Andre Remoussin, shortly past midnight and left for Newark, N.J., to find the mother -- her daughter -- identified as Vicki Remoussin, 36.

Baltimore Police Cpl. Paul Martin said Mrs. Remoussin, who was "in a confused state" and has "bouts of confusion," arrived in the Baltimore area from Belgium yesterday and apparently left her son in the restaurant in the first block of Kingston Road about 9 a.m.

Baltimore television news reports and pictures of the crying child, wearing a diaper and a T-shirt, failed to turn up any relatives or friends and police did not learn the child's name until the grandmother arrived.

fTC Corporal Martin said the boy's mother drove to Newark, where she was found by Port Authority police late last night. Police said it was unlikely any criminal charge would be lodged in the case.

"The grandmother was elated to see the child," said Officer Robert Caskey. "He didn't want anything to do with the TV cameras. He just wanted to go home."

Three people died yesterday in traffic accidents, state police reported.

And Anita Cureton, 27, of the 7300 block of Mallory Court in Baltimore, died Thursday at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center of injuries she received when she was struck by a pickup truck April 30 while crossing Pulaski Highway near her home, city police said. Her 5-month-old fetus was stillborn the day of the accident.

Yesterday, Esther Hoffman of Middletown was killed about 2:30 p.m. when the car in which she was a passenger struck an embankment and overturned when the driver swerved to avoid a dog on U.S. 40 near Hawbottom Road.

The driver, Dana Lichtenberger, 33, also of Middletown, was treated at Frederick Memorial Hospital and released, state police said.

In Baltimore, George Michael Rowe, 30, of Falls Church, Va., was killed about 5 a.m. when his car swerved off Interstate 83 near Timonium, struck a tree and overturned, state police reported.

Sgt. Martin E. Knight of the Golden Ring barracks said Mr. Rowe, who was dead at the scene, may have fallen asleep at the wheel, "awoke and overcorrected."

Shortly before 1 a.m. yesterday, Craig A. Lewis, 18, of Bowling Green, was operating a Honda 250XL motorcycle in Potomac Industrial Park off Md. 220 when he lost control of the vehicle and crashed into a traffic sign, said Sgt. Thomas Alderman, of the Allegany County Sheriff's Office.

Sergeant Alderman said the victim, who was not wearing a helmet, died a short time later at Cumberland Memorial Hospital.

*

There was no jackpot winner in Maryland's Lotto drawing Saturday night, which was worth an estimated $5 million.

The winning numbers were 11-15-30-41-42-49. Five numbers were picked by 59 players, with each ticket worth $1,096. Four numbers were picked by 2,848 players, with each ticket worth $38. The drawing Wednesday night will be worth an estimated $6 million.

Baltimore City

Conditions at the Baltimore City Detention Center returned to normal yesterday as officials lifted the lockdown in place since Friday's disturbance left eight guards and four inmates hurt.

"Everything is back to normal," Barbara A. Cooper, a spokeswoman for the jail, said last night.

The jail's 2,900 prisoners, most awaiting trial, had been confined to their cells since Saturday.

The incident began about 11:30 p.m. Friday when several of the 51 inmates in the segregated unit set fire to their mattresses.

As the inmates were being transferred to another unit, a melee broke out with prisoners using broken pieces of furniture as weapons. Correctional officers brought the situation under control by 1:30 a.m. The incident is under investigation.

Anne Arundel

The county has postponed but not abandoned plans to merge its computer system with those of the school system and Anne Arundel Community College.

After a free, four-week IBM study of the plan, the county has cited a $850,000 price tag, and no immediate cost savings for the fiscal year beginning July 1, as its reasons for postponing action.

"The county, the Board of Education and the community college have agreed to study IBM's recommendations," said Jerry Klasmeier, Arundel's director of central services. "We have not abandonned the notion [of merging]."

IBM said the county could save $6.6 million over five years by merging computer systems.

The study also concluded that a merger could eliminate 23 of 118 data processing positions.

Carroll

The county commissioners are reconsidering their proposed recycling plan after residents and representatives of refuse firms complained at a public hearing last week.

The commissioners are reconsidering having one recycling center for the entire county and making the program mandatory.

Under state law, Carroll must recycle 15 percent of its waste by 1994. "If we can get 15 percent without requiring mandatory recycling then that's what we should do," said Commissioner Elmer C. Lippy.

The plan also would prohibit non-profit groups from selling aluminum cans to scrap yards without a permit. Individual residents would not be able to sell the aluminum at all.

"We're also leaning towards a plan that addresses the concerns of the residents, particularly those who are in charity efforts," Commissioner Lippy said.

Harford

The County Council on Thursday will conduct its second and final public hearing on the proposed $188.6 million operating budget for fiscal 1993.

The hearing begins at 7 p.m. at C. Milton Wright High School, on Md. 543 near Bel Air.

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