Recall slogans, win a lunch

The Ticker

May 11, 1992|By Julius Westheimer

Many Maryland firms and individuals spend thousands of dollars each year on advertising slogans, many well-known, some not-so. How many of these 12 can you identify? I warn you, some are oldies.

If you think you know them, print and mail your answers on a postcard (no letters accepted) in the same order as listed below, to Julius Westheimer, Ticker Contest, JW-6000, Evening Sun, Baltimore, Md. 21278.

Print your name, address and home phone number. For the first two cards received with the most correct answers, Mrs. Ticker and I will take you and a guest to lunch at The Center Club. In case of ties, we'll pull postcards from a hat. Postmark deadline: midnight Thursday, May 21. Get busy! (Answers next week.)

"People who care for people who need care."

"Exceeding the expected."

"Light for all."

"Baltimore's Best Store."

"Where the news comes first."

"No frills, no music, no dancing. The value is on the platter."

"If you can't trust Moses, who can you trust?"

"Your car knows."

"Let's talk about it."

"Soles of honor since 1872."

"Y. M. B. O. D."

"Especially for you."

WE'RE SHOOK UP: "Women in the Workplace: Men All Shook Up," reads a headline in Business Week, dated today. Excerpts: "Sexual integration in the workplace may be a lot harder on men than it is on women, says the newsletter Work in America by management professor Anne S. Tsui of the University of California at Irvine. . . . Research found that men in all-male work environments show the strongest commitment to their jobs, and their commitment declines as the percentage of women rises. . . . By contrast, Tsui found that women are equally committed whether they are the only women in a group or work in a largely female unit."

WORKPLACE WISDOM: "Most people don't understand their company's retirement plan," says Anna Polizzi-Keller, partner, Ernst & Young, adding, "To make the most of your retirement, start planning now." Her bulletin continues, "Here are questions to ask: How do benefits differ if I'm terminated, take early retirement or leave at the normal retirement age? What happens if I leave today? Is there a vesting schedule that makes me stay with the company a set number of years to receive full benefits? Will I receive a "dollar value" fixed pension you can estimate now? Are plan benefits geared to inflation? The article ends, "The earlier you start asking these and other questions, the more you'll be able to achieve."

MAY FLOWERS: "To move up in business, you must first learn to speak," says Brent Filson in his new book, "Executive Speeches: 51 CEOs Tell You How." Excerpts: Your chance to give a speech can boost your career; write the intro you want the M.C. to use; sell one idea; be extra prepared; reveal yourself by sharing a personal experience; in the Q&A session, work in things you forgot to say. . . . For better fax-buying, buy a machine with only the features you need. Sophisticated options look nice but can be difficult to operate, while increasing cost." (Wall Street Journal).

"When answering complaint letters, let customers know you're eager to solve their problem, show empathy, tell what you can do rather than what you can't do, sandwich bad news between two bits of good news, reiterate that you value the customer and, if possible, give something extra." (Nation's Business). . . . 80 percent of your first impression is non-verbal," says Working Woman, May., adding, "You should 'walk tall,' grip with a firm handshake, make immediate eye contact with the person you're going to speak to. . . ." Virtually all employees want to do good work, and, properly crafted, criticism shows them how." (Consultant Judith Schuster). . . . "Success is that old ABC -- ability, breaks and courage." (Charles Luckman). . . . "Give them quality; that's the best kind of advertising." (Milton S. Hershey). . . . "The toughest part of success is that you've got to keep on being a success." (Irving Berlin).

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