No. 6 Maryland storms by UMBC, 20-7 Terps hope victory impresses NCAA

May 03, 1992|By Doug Brown | Doug Brown,Staff Writer

Dick Edell wanted an impressive victory from his Maryland team. He got it.

Intent on making a final strong impression on the committee that will select the 12-team NCAA tournament field today, the No. 6 Terps (8-4) crushed UMBC, 20-7, yesterday before 1,500 at UMBC Stadium.

"We played all 33 kids and everybody played a lot," Edell said, underscoring one of the few benefits of a lopsided win.

Seven of the previous 10 Maryland-UMBC games were decided by four goals or fewer. A year ago, UMBC upset the Terps. But this one was close only after the first quarter, when UMBC led, 3-2.

Maryland scored the next four goals and seven of the next nine for a 9-5 halftime lead. The Terps led, 17-6, after three quarters.

Maryland got three goals apiece from Blake Wynot, Jon Schoenweitz, Chris Dail and Dan Reading.

UMBC's Steve Marohl had two goals and two assists, raising to (( 77 his NCAA single-season assist record. He finished with a school-record 242 career points.

"We figured Maryland would control the ball, and they did," Marohl said. "Maybe that rubbed off on us, because when we did get the ball we rushed things."

The Terps' dominance in possession was helped by their 25-6 advantage in faceoffs, with Andy Claxton doing much of the work.

Maryland rebounded from a one-goal loss to No. 2 North Carolina in the final of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament. That, Edell said, could have been a factor in the team's slow start yesterday.

"That was an emotional experience, back-to-back games in the tournament and coming within seconds of the ACC championship," Edell said. "I guess, after the first quarter, things just started clicking again."

UMBC (10-5) completed an otherwise successful season with successive losses to what coach Dick Watts calls the "big three" -- Loyola, Towson State and Maryland. In each game, the Retrievers had a horrid second quarter, surrendering a total of 24 goals, seven yesterday.

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