Hopkins uses Hofstra as tune-up for showdown vs. Towson State

April 30, 1992|By Bill Free | Bill Free,Staff Writer

With the traditional late-season duel against longtime rival Towson State three days away, the last thing fourth-ranked Johns Hopkins wanted last night was a tough battle against unranked Hofstra at Homewood Field.

The Blue Jays had it their way and waltzed to a 15-4 victory over the Flying Dutchmen in a game that was never close.

Hopkins (6-3) scored the first four goals in less than eight minutes and built a 9-1 halftime lead, enabling coach Tony Seaman to use his bench in the second half.

Seaman used three goalkeepers and said: "It was great to give everybody a chance to play. We needed a game like this in the middle of the week instead of a practice. By this time of the season, we're tired of seeing each other."

Freshman attackman Terry Riordan scored four goals and had one assist to lead the Blue Jays, and sophomore attackman Brian Piccola had one goal and four assists.

Hopkins ran its offense to perfection most of the game, keeping the ball away from Hofstra, which was supposed to have enough speed to give the Blue Jays some trouble.

But that speed never surfaced and the Flying Dutchmen showed a lack of poise often on offense, attempting to force shots in double-team situations instead of finding the open man.

"That's our inexperience coming through," Hofstra coach John Danowski said. "They whipped us pretty good, but we could have made things more interesting if we had hit some

of those early shots. Our goalkeeper [freshman Kevin Johnson] was a little nervous and that didn't help. Physically, they were bigger than us and more talented."

Moments after defeating Hofstra (4-8), Seaman and his players started to think about Towson State, which the Blue Jays will play 2 p.m. Saturday at Homewood Field.

"Towson State is going to throw a lot at us," Seaman said. "You know they're going to be pumped up and trying to impress the tournament selection committee (NCAA). There is always a lot of emotion in a Towson game, and we have to maintain our focus."

Hopkins dominated the game except for shots, with a 36-32 advantage.

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