From sap To Syrup

April 19, 1992|By DAVID HARP

On the family farm in Garrett County the Steyer crew has been tapping sugar maples to make syrup since 1908. This year, Michael Steyer (pronounced STOY-er) and his helpers gathered 40,000 gallons of maple sap and boiled it down to just under 1.000 gallons of syrup. It is a process that blends time-honored procedures using kettles and cord wood with newer technologies, including a "reverse osmosis" machine that removes up to 75 percent of the water in the sap before more traditional boiling. During the first tap of trees in February, the crew drilled 6,200 holes to extract the rising sap, collecting some it in 16-quart galvanized buckets hanging from spouts, just as their ancestors did in winters gone by.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.