'The way things were'

SYLVIA BADGER

April 19, 1992|By SYLVIA BADGER

The Junior League's Garden Party Fashion Show drew a record number of properly clad early risers to the Towson Town Center recently. More than 400 people enjoyed an upbeat fashion show and a delicious breakfast prepared by the Brass Elephant.

A friend of mine, Sandy Hargrave, was one of many guests who wore hats and gloves to herald the "way things were"! Other hat wearers included Ginna Schmidt, Lynn Havard, Katie Stevens, Marge Weaver, Polly Behrens, Sheila Peters, Susan Mason, Joyce McCrystle, Nancy Gephart and Ann King, who organized the hat-wearing campaign and whose daughter, Kathy, was chair of the fashion show committee.

Carolyn McEnrue, WBAL-TV, who overslept and arrived wit slightly damp hair (which did not dampen her looks), was seen chatting with Diane Lewis, Towson Town Center's dynamic director of marketing, and Stacey Kram, Gray Kirk VanSant account exec, whose model-banker fiance, John Molli, was in the show. By day he works for Maryland National; in his spare time, he models, nationally and internationally.

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It's almost a mission impossible to plan and pull off a surprise birthday party for your husband when you live and work together, but Millie Downey managed, with a little help from friends and family. The birthday boy, Joe Downey, owner of Old Point Builders on the Eastern Shore, celebrated the big 5-0 in style.

Several hundred people were on his front lawn when he returned from a boat ride Sunday afternoon. Neil and Jean Lecompte (he's a CPA); Mary Helen and Jim Friel (of Friel's Lumber); Judge Bob Karwacki and his wife, Marion; Mary Davy and Jim Pippin (he's president of Centreville National Bank); Diane and Mark Freestate (of Freestate Insurance Co.); and Maurice and Ellen Sanger (he's a Western Auto store owner) were among them.

Others enjoying the tasty food and taking a look at Downey's new boat were Joe's parents, Rebecca and Joseph Downey, and in-laws, Anna and Charles Fink. The party was a great success, but Millie says there won't be another one until Joe is maybe 100.

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As kids of all ages know, the circus is coming to town. From April 30 to May 10, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey's most talented performers will be entertaining us at the Baltimore Arena.

One of those performers, who is used to being the center of attention, is ringmaster Eric Michael Gillett, a talented singer, actor, aerobics instructor and gourmet cook. If, by May 4, you haven't caught his act at the Arena, then you can hear him sing the National Anthem at the Orioles game in the new stadium.

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A fund-raiser, chaired by Kelly Ripken and Rhea Feiken, christened the new Greater Baltimore Osteoporosis Center, which is located in Owings Mills. The center's medical director, Eugenia Pavlov, says proceeds will be used to help needy patients and to fund research.

Kelly brought along goodies donated by her Most Valuable Player husband, Cal, which helped raise $4,500 for the center. Glenn Martin bid $500 to get Cal's autographed Louisville Slugger bat, and Mary Martin bought a baseball signed by Cal for $200, while Dennis Rasmussen paid $150 for a glove signed by Ripken.

Other popular auction items were a baseball signed by the whole team, for which Lee Seabolt paid $325, and six Orioles box seats bought by Dr. Barbara Simmons for $350.

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I've always heard that rugby players love action, and from what I hear, several of them are investing their time and money in the restaurant-bar scene. The American Revolution Tavern and Rugby Pub on Maryland Avenue has been given a needed face lift by its new owner Dr. Jack Gordan, a longtime rugby player who has toured all over the world as a team doctor and player. Another player, Lance French, is managing the old "Rev."

Then there's a new Mexican eatery, the No Way, Jose Cafe, in South Baltimore, which is owned by Dave Chandler of Chesapeake Rubgy Club and his partner, Joel Greenfeld.

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