A Barbaric ActYour story on the execution of Brian Pennel...

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

March 25, 1992

A Barbaric Act

Your story on the execution of Brian Pennel (Sunday Sun, March 15) left me with a troubled view of today's society. In my opinion, capital punishment is a cosmetic attempt to sweep aside our fears and to act upon a desire for veageance.

This is not to say that i am in favor of coddling convicted murderers. Of course, the families of victims of these reprehensible crimes deserve justice. Capital punishment, however, is not justice.

The objective of justice is to provide a solution to the ills of society, and the execution of a murderer, no matter how senseless his or her crime may be, does nothing to this end. When a murderer is executed the pain of the victim's family is not allayed. And we as a people are left with nothing but false sense of satisfaction, as if by washing our hands the ugly stains will dissappear.

With crime advancing rapidly across our city and our state, it is time to proactively confront the foundation of crime rather than to react, however urgent the need for this may feel.

Christian Schlekat

Baltimore

House Cleaning

Is it any wonder that this country is so far in debt and that economically we are a basket case? The goings-on concerning the House banking scandal in Washington indicate that many of our congressmen don't know how to add and suibtract.

Once the scandal broke, there was a rush to blame the problem on everything and everybody but the individual who was writing the checks in question. The bank itself seems to have caused part of the problem but certainly not all of it.

Didn't any of these people keep track of their own money? Most of us keep a bankbook and know within a few dollars how much money we have. Apparently, our elected officials don't. The worst part of this is these are the same people that control the purse strings for the country. Is it any wonder that we are in such a mess?

Many representatives hace just been there too ong and their arrogance knows no bounds. A good example is Congressman Steny Hoyer, who at first denied any bad checks and then admitted to the bad checks but said it was none of our business. If we are ever to get our financial house in order, we may have to get a whole new crew down in Washington to do it.

Allan F. Grant

Pasdena

A Centuries-old Conflict

The essence of The Sun's March 17 editorial on the Nagorno-Karabakh issue is in total contradiction to its title. However,the tenor of the writing is fairly consistant with your newspaper's anti-Armenian stand.

To the perceptive reader this editorial is but a thinly disguised call to arms against the Armenian diaspora will support armed conflict with troops and supplies is highly speculative and flagrantly preposterous; traditionally (unlike their age-old foes) Armenians have placed greater reliance on negotiation than on warfare to resolve their border disputes.

Even though isolated by geography from the rest of Christendom, Armenia has for centuries stood up to its Moslem neighbors with little help from the Western world. Although numerically outnumbered by the Azeris, Armenians could again weather this crisis -- albeit at a great cost of lives.

The last thing the region needs is meddling into centuries-old conflict by ill-informed Western nations. Let the leaders of the two countries continue negotiating for peace. It is too early for The Sun to incite "neighboring Islamic countries to join the fray."

Eddie Bilezikian

Towson

Quack Quack

An old adage says, "If it looks like a duck, acts like a duck, and sounds like a duck, chances are it's a duck." Bill Clinton doesn't look, act or sound like a president, but the melange that gave us Mondale and Dukakis is close to selecting him as the Democratic nominee.

In the past, many of us who would like to have had a better choice merely voted against the Democrat. This year it is entirely possible that many Americans will simply stay away from the polls. This would work almost as well for George Bush as a vote against Bill Clinton, assuring Bush that he, like Saddam Hussein, will continue to have a job.

William K. Lester

Round Bay

Empty Headline

From your headline of March 20, "It's now Clinton's race to lose," I can't decide if you are being pessimistic, realistic or prejudiced.

I think it's the latter. Couldn't you have said, "It's now Clinton's race to win"? I guess your glass is half empty!

Jane E. Johnson

Baltimore

Bush the Hero

It has been obvious that the long-term strategy of the Democratic Party has been, by any means possible, to force President Bush to break his no-tax pledge which Congress forced on him or close down the government because of no budget.

To admit an error takes courage. He explained that he should have resisted them instead of trying to negotiate in a civil manner. (That was his mistake. But can this go on forever?) With Mr. Bush his country comes first. His sincerity shows through, even to admitting that he did "not like the political flap."

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