Summit joins team to build Eutaw Place Afro-American site to be used for apartments.

COMMERCIAL REALTY NOTES

March 18, 1992|By Edward Gunts | Edward Gunts,Staff Writer

The Baltimore office of Summit Properties, headed by developer David Tufaro, has joined the development team planning to build Eutaw Place, a 59-unit, $6 million apartment complex on the site of the Afro-American newspaper.

Summit, developer of the 196-unit Waterloo Place apartment complex in Mount Vernon, is working with Cornelius W. May, head of the May Development Co. in Columbia.

Mr. May said last year that he has a contract to buy the Afro-American headquarters at 628 N. Eutaw St. and is seeking state aid to build housing for low- and moderate-income people.

Architect Ed Hord, of Hord, Coplan and Macht, told Baltimore's Design Advisory Panel last week he'll base the design of his five-story project on the old Albion Hotel, now called Cathedral Court, at Cathedral and Read streets.

Mr. May has said Afro officials are seeking new office space for the newspaper and that the relocation will not affect newspaper production because the printing presses are elsewhere. He said the exact timetable for buying the 23,000-square-foot building and starting construction of Eutaw Place will depend on how soon he can get funding.

Charles Village

Baltimore's housing department has set a April 17 deadlinfor developers' bids for recycling the former city school headquarters at 3 to 5 E. 25th St. in lower Charles Village.

City officials say they have received one acceptable proposal and are seeking competing bids before awarding the property. The Baltimore Corporation for Housing Partnerships' proposal calls for two buildings to be converted to a $6 million complex with 56 apartments, a day care center and offices. More information about the building is available from Richard Byrd of the housing department's land disposition office at 396-4121.

College of Fellows

Michael E. Bolinger, a principal of the Baltimore architectural firm of Cochran, Stephenson and Donkervoet Inc.; Stanford Britt, an architect with offices in Baltimore and Washington; and Fernand Dahan of Rockville have been named to the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects.

They will be invested in the college at the AIA's national convention in Boston on June 20.

National Aquarium

David M. Pittenger has been promoted to Deputy Executive Director of the National Aquarium in Baltimore as part of a new 10-member senior management group.

Nicholas Brown is the aquarium's executive director. Other members of the senior management group are: Christopher Andrews, senior director of husbandry and operations; Stevenson W. Close Jr., senior director of institutional advancement; Robert Jenkins, executive office for environmental affairs; Paula Schaedlich, senior director of education and interpretation; Kathy Cloyd Sher, senior director of marketing and planning; Mark Donovan, chief of design; Marshall K Judges, senior project manager for capital programs, and Jerry C. Vega, controller.

Around the region

* FM Contractors has completed a 15,000-square-foot Parish Center at 9215 Old Harford Road for St. Isaac Jogues. The architect was Brian Kelly of Kelly Clayton & Mojzisek. His father designed the original parish hall more than 20 years ago.

* With an offer of $3 million, Burlington Coat Factory Warehouse Corp. was the high bidder last week for the Columbia Eastgate Shopping Center in Jessup. Burlington is the largest tenant of the 131,880 square foot complex and plans to expand. The auction was a foreclosure sale on behalf of Maryland National Bank.

* After renovations, Westview Mall will hold a Grand Reopening Gala and Benefit at 7:30 p.m. March 26.

* Goodwrappers, a packaging company, has moved to 1920 Halethorpe Farms Road in Baltimore. The building was designed and built by William H. Knott Inc., with assistance from Tony Corteal of STV/Lyon Engineers and Ron Brasher of D. R. Brasher Architects.

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