Csx, Residents Criticize Proposed Recycling Plant

Opponents Fear Facility Could End Up Junkyard

February 27, 1992|By John A. Morris | John A. Morris,Staff writer

Pasadena already has eight junkyards and doesn't need a ninth, opponents of a proposed car dismantling and recycling plant said yesterday.

CSX Realty, developers of a 2,273-home planned community on Marley Creek, and two salvage yard operators joined with area residents in asking the county Board of Appeals to deny a special exception needed to build the plant on 3.4 acres in the 6600 block of Fort Smallwood Road.

Jack Feehly, president of the Greater Pasadena Council, which represents 28 communities, said residents have worked with CSX, which owns 1,600 acres in the area, to clean up Pasadena's image.

"The northeast area for too long has been considered the backyard . . . whereevery unsightly use imaginable can be put," Feehly said. "This (recycling plant) flies right in the face of our 'Pasadena Pride' initiative."

Michael J. Loher, owner of Mike's Auto Parts in Hanover, wants to build a warehouse on the site, where cars would be dismantled, parts stored and oil and other fluids recycled. He said the modern plant would replace, and be an improvement over, his 10-year-old junkyard at Dorsey and Ridge roads.

But residents fear it will become just another junkyard. They listed eight salvage operations within five miles of the proposed plant.

Alfred Reiff, of the 6600 block of Fort Smallwood Road, built his home 44 years ago on property adjacent to the proposed recycling plant.

"Over the years, I've seen nothingbut deterioration of that area," Reiff said. "At times, it's difficult to get a decent breath of fresh air. All this here is just added aggravation."

After the meeting, Mary Rosso, who testified for the Silver Sands Improvement Association and the Maryland Waste Coalition, a citizens group organized a decade ago to battle hazardous waste sites, said she was angry and frustrated by interruptions and objections by Chairwoman Barbara Hale and Darryl Henry, a lawyer representingLoher.

"The community is at a major disadvantage without a lawyer," Rosso said. "I don't understand why (the appeals board) couldn't show a little more leeway with the community."

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