Counseling Fees Pass

February 26, 1992

ANNAPOLIS — The House passed a bill, 128-4, that would enable youth services bureaus statewide to charge fees for counseling based on the income of aclient's family.

George Giese, director of Carroll's Youth Service Bureau, testified earlier this month in favor of the legislation intended to help the financially strapped agencies. The state has cut its contributions to youth services bureaus twice in the last year.

Youth service bureaus counsel youths and their families to prevent and reduce delinquent acts and substance-abuse problems, and to help dysfunctional families develop new modes of behavior.

The bill now goes to the Senate.

ADD $728,948 FOR POLICE

DATELINE: ANNAPOLIS

ANNAPOLIS -- The county commissioners would have to find an additional $728,948 in county money to make up for proposed fiscal 1993 statecuts in the Resident Trooper Program, Carroll's main law enforcementdivision.

A Department of Fiscal Services analysis shows that Carroll government would have to pay an additional $592,504 in direct costs for troopers and $136,444 in administrative costs to the MarylandState Police to keep the program intact if the governor's proposal is approved.

This year's county budget for resident troopers is about $2.2 million.

The increase would translate to about 3 cents on the county's tax rate of $2.35 per $100 of assessed property value.

The cuts also are contingent upon the passage of legislation that would change the funding formula for the program providing state troopers to local governments. Currently, the state contributes 25 percentof the troopers' cost, with local governments picking up the remaining 75 percent. Under the bill, local governments would pay 100 percent.

Carroll employs 44 of the 66 resident troopers, which cost about $54,000 each. Four others are stationed in Mount Airy.

The proposal also includes increasing from 10.5 percent to 23.03 percent the overhead costs that local governments would pay for the troopers.

Carroll's total cost to maintain the program next year would be about $3 million.

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