Police, MVA probe license scam Also questioned is possible lapse at BWI in failing to hold teen.

February 19, 1992|By Joe Nawrozki | Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer

Maryland State Police and the MVA have launched a joint investigation into why two airport state troopers failed to detain a young man who tried to rent a vehicle with a credit card and driver's license taken from a kidnap victim more than twice his age.

The investigation also focuses on how Dontay Carter, 18 -- charged with the Feb. 11 abduction and slaying of Vitalis Pilius, 37, of Catonsville, and abducting two other men between Feb. 7 and Feb. 14 -- was apparently able to obtain two fraudulent licenses at the Motor Vehicle Administration's Mondawmin office.

Chuck Jackson, a State Police spokesman, says the agency is conducting an investigation in cooperation with the MVA and an an administrative review of the matter at Baltimore-Washington International Airport.

"Preliminarily we feel that these troopers who were called to the Budget Rent-A-Car counter to investigate did so thoroughly and properly. As a result of that investigation, we had no probable cause or evidence to charge this individual," Mr. Jackson says.

Authorities say a young man identified as Carter appeared at the rental car office at BWI just hours after Mr. Pilius was abducted and slain. Two state troopers were called after a clerk questioned the man's age and noted irregularities in the man's signature on the rental car application and the signature on Mr. Pilius' credit card.

Mr. Jackson says the troopers conducted a license check, an MVA check for outstanding traffic warrants and a brief criminal check to determine if Carter was wanted. All checks came back negative, he says.

"On Tuesday night the report that we had was the fraudulent use of a credit card. That's what we were called to investigate," Mr. Jackson says. When the information on the credit card did not check out, the clerk from the car rental firm kept it.

"At that point, as far as we were concerned, our investigation was completed," Mr. Jackson says.

The administrative review, which will be conducted by the officers' superiors at BWI, will consist of a review of written reports on the call, Mr. Jackson says.

"Today, we know more than we did on the 11th, and because of the events that have unfurled in the last 48 hours, we feel compelled to conduct a thorough review of all the matters relating to this individual and the matters that had any involvement with the Maryland State Police," he says.

Meanwhile, the MVA is examining a scheme allegedly used by Carter to obtain fraudulent licenses at the MVA's Mondawmin office. Carter allegedly obliterated the photos on the licenses of two victims, Mr. Pilius and Dr. Daniel Ford. He took the licenses to the MVA office, claimed they were his, and requested new licenses that had his photo affixed to them.

Thomas Walsh, an associate administrator at the MVA, says the agency is trying to determine how easily phony licenses may be obtained at its 19 field offices.

"We don't think it is a widespread practice," says Mr. Walsh. He says MVA employees who issue driver's licenses or MVA identification cards will be reminded that obliterated photos "are potential misrepresentations."

"They will be reminded that each person seeking a new license from a destroyed card must present additional documentation," Mr. Walsh says. "We will make sure our people are certain that they recognize misrepresentation," he adds.

Carter and another suspect, Clarence Woodward, 16, of the 2400 block of E. Hoffman St., have been charged with murdering Mr. Pilius, an engineer with Hewlett-Packard Co. Carter and two other suspects, Dwayne Reed, 16, of the 5500 block of the Alameda, and Damien Daniels, 18, of the 2200 block of Henneman Ave., have been charged with abducting Dr. Ford, a Johns Hopkins physician.

Carter is charged with kidnapping a third man, Douglas Legenhausen, 46, a wholesale jeweler. The three victims were abducted at gunpoint from parking garages in Baltimore.

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