Baker HughesRemaining profitable in a shrinking industry...

STOCK WATCH

February 19, 1992|By Opinions on stocks offered by investment experts. Compiled by Steve Halpern for Knight Ridder.

Baker Hughes

Remaining profitable in a shrinking industry is no mean trick, but it's what Baker Hughes (NYSE, BHI, $18.625) has done in the oil service sector, says United & Babson Investment Report.

"Baker Hughes is a good example of a survivor. Over the past two years, it has sold several divisions, while focusing on directional drilling and data monitoring. With 61 percent of its sales generated outside the United States, the firm is well-situated to outlast the domestic downturn."

Amoco

"Our latest monthly stock highlight is Amoco (NYSE, AN, $46.875) which should be among any investor's core holdings," says Richard Young, Intelligence Report.

"Amoco is the largest private owner of natural gas reserves in North America. We believe natural gas is an outstanding investment for the 1990s. . . . Meanwhile, Amoco, which is down from its 1990 peak of $60 per share, pays a $2.20-per-share dividend for a current yield of 4.7 percent."

Helmerich & Payne

"Helmerich and Payne (NYSE, HP, $20.50) is one of the most financially secure firms on the New York exchange," says Francis Curzio, F.X.C. Investors.

"The company's assets include 69 oil- and gas-drilling rigs, an interest in about one-half million acres of oil and gas leases, and significant oil reserves. The company also holds 740,000 shares of Schlumberger, 1.2 million shares of Sun Co. and 200,000 shares of Phillips Petroleum."

Texaco

"Texaco (NYSE, TX, $57.75) may be the most undervalued blue chip on the New York exchange," says Richard Band, Profitable Investing.

"Texaco is yielding well over 5 percent -- twice the average of industrial stocks. If the rest of the market starts to wobble, investors will flock to higher-yielding stocks like Texaco. What's more, the stock is poised to rake in fatter profits in 1992 as a reviving U.S. economy boosts consumption of oil and gas."

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