'Father of the Bride' will become a grandfather

February 05, 1992|By Andy Marx | Andy Marx,Los Angeles Times

HOLLYWOOD -- Somehow we're not surprised. There will be a sequel to Touchstone Pictures' hit remake of the 1950 "Father of the Bride" -- a remake of the 1951 sequel, "Father's Little Dividend."

Nancy Meyers and Charles Shyer, the writing-directing team responsible for the remake, which has already grossed almost $70 million, say the sequel will star Steve Martin, Diane Keaton and Kimberley Williams and the rest of the original

cast. But Mr. Shyer says that it will depart slightly from "Father's Little Dividend."

"I don't think we'll be as faithful to this one as we were to the original," he says. Like that sequel, though, the daughter will have a baby and Steve Martin will be a reluctant grandfather, though Mr. Shyer adds, "we're going to have a few other surprises."

But first the two want to shoot one of two of their own original screenplays. The first is "Toast of the Town," which Ms. Meyers de

scribes as "a Depression-era comedy about a small-town girl who comes to the big city, loses her values and then finds them again.

"It's a plot that's somewhat typical of comedies that were made back then," says Mr. Shyer. "For some reason, those seem to be suitable and relevant for today."

The other project is called "Love Crazy," a modern-day relationship comedy that Ms. Meyers says is closer in style to two of the team's other films, "Private Benjamin" and "Baby Boom."

Ms. Meyers says that "Love Crazy" was a project they were working on when they were offered "Father of the Bride." "We never got a chance to finish it," she says, "and for our own needs, we want to get it done and then we'll decide which one we want to make. We're in a very fortunate position right now. We're getting offered a ton of stuff . . . but we want to do our own scripts."

Although nothing is definite, Ms. Meyers says they'll probably do their next couple of pictures at Touchstone.

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