Lehmans giving party for Anne Truitt

SYLVIA BADGER

February 05, 1992|By SYLVIA BADGER

The director of the Baltimore Museum of Art, Arnold Lehman, and his wife, Pamela, are hosting a private dinner party this evening for artist Anne Truitt, prior to the opening of an exhibition of her works, which are modern, painted wood sculptures.

Others invited to dinner with this artistic Baltimore native are her daughters, Mary Hill and Alexandra Truitt; Andre Emmerich, Truitt's New York art dealer; Dorsey Waxter, former Baltimorean who is a New York art consultant; Mrs. Constance Caplan, BMA Trustee and founder of the Collectors Circle, a group of Baltimoreans who provide support for new acquisitions; and Peggy and Louis Thalheimer, chairman of the BMA's Board of Trustees.

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The Southern exposure was certainly agreeable for Crown Central CEO Henry Rosenberg's horse, "Dash for Dottie," which won a significant allowance race at Gulf Stream Park in Florida last weekend. On hand for the victory was Henry's wife, Dot, for whom the horse was named; his son Ned, a senior vice president in the financial division of Crown Central Petroleum; Dot's daughter, Mary Ellen, and her husband, Tim Fuller; Jane Blaustein; Frank Strzelczyk, who has been with the family business for years; and Donna Donovan,wife of the trainer, Bill Donovan.

Margaret McManus and Jim McKay joined the group for lunch in the Turf Club at Gulf Stream where McKay was broadcasting the feature race ABC-TV. Baltimoreans Bootsie and Don Levinson, who winter in Palm Beach, were in an adjoining box and helped root "Dash for Dottie" home first. The Levinsons own "Lost Code," an outstanding thoroughbred also trained by Bill Donovan.

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This is a golden year for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Associates, which came into being Oct. 8, 1942. Things have changed a lot since the ladies, in hats and white gloves, of course, founded this group.

What better way to bring home some of the best ideas from those years than at Decade Dinners? Lynn Little, chair of the 50th anniversary year celebrations, and her committee came up with this clever way to celebrate, and about 90 people attended. She and her husband Jim hosted a "Fabulous 40s" dinner at their home, which was once the home of '40s film star Dorothy Lamour.

Sharon and Gary Mallery served meat loaf as their Blue Plate special at a "Nifty '50s" party, where the centerpieces were little jukeboxes. Dr. Harry Stevens and his wife Katie played to a full house at their "Swinging '60s" party.

And Bernice and Harry Robinson held forth at a "Scandalous '70s" dinner where guests ate quiche, salads and dessert fondues. The "Fern Bar of the '80s" was held in the botanical sun room of Dr. Bernard and Mary McGibbon where an elaborate California cuisine was served.

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