Galvin's buzzer-beater breaks dry spell for Mount St. Mary's

January 22, 1992|By Kent Baker | Kent Baker,Staff Correspondent

EMMITSBURG -- Mount St. Mary's, which had squandered second-half leads four games in a row, did it again last night, but this time the Mountaineers charged from behind, too, and nudged St. Francis (Pa.), 87-84. Phil Galvin's buzzer-beating three-pointer gave the Mount its first Northeast Conference victory of the season.

It was the proper climax for a game dominated by long-range shooting, particularly by Harkeem Dixon of the Red Flash, who was virtually unstoppable in the first half (six of seven from three-point range) and finished with a game-high 29 points.

But Dixon missed a 23-foot attempt with the score tied at 84, setting up Galvin's heroics. The Mount's improving freshman Michael Watson rebounded and flipped the ball to Jeff Hall, who called a timeout with six seconds left.

On the ensuing inbounds play, the ball went to Watson, who shrugged off a double-team in the center of the court and got the ball up the side to Galvin, who was being tracked by Jim Horn, a defensive replacement for that play.

Horn went for the steal, but Galvin came up with the ball, turned and swished the game-winner to snap a seven-game losing streak for coach Jim Phelan's team.

"I knew I had to come to the ball," said Galvin, who had problems both offensively and defensively early. "I didn't know who how much time was left, but knew I had to get something off. It was all feel."

The win was a first in 1992 for coach Jim Phelan's Mounties. Phelan is now nine wins short of 700 for his career. The Mount had not won since December Dec. 28 when it upset Georgia State to capture its own holiday tournament.

"This we really had to have to boost our confidence," said Galvin, who packed 11 of his 16 points into the final 6:21.

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