Man, 19, Is Guilty In Slaying

Victim Had Helped Bail Killer Out Of Jail

January 08, 1992|By Peter Hermann | Peter Hermann,Staff writer

A 19-year-old Gambrills man pleaded guilty yesterday to second-degree murder in the killing last summer of a teen-ager who had helped bail him out of jail.

MacArthur Rayman, of the 1200 block of Waugh Chapel Road, also pleaded guilty to two counts of burglary and one count of setting a fire while committing a crime -- charges unrelated to the killing. Sentencing on all charges has been set for March 2.

Marcus Maddox, 19, who lived with his parents in Cape St. Claire,was shot twice in the head and once in the shoulder June 26 with a .22-caliber semi-automatic rifle. His brother found the body wrapped in a sheet and dumped in a closet.

Assistant State's Attorney Ronald Naditch told the court that on June 25, Maddox's mother, Monica, was contacted by her other son, Quentin, who was serving a year in the Anne Arundel County Detention Center on drug charges.

Naditch saidQuentin Maddox asked his parents to bail out Rayman, who shared a cell with him and was being held on $10,000 bond.

Court records showthe mother paid a bail bondsman $1,000 with a credit card, and Naditch said she and Marcus Maddox drove to the jail to pick Rayman up. When the mother got tired of waiting, Maddox drove her home, then returned to the detention center, where he met Rayman at 1 a.m., Naditch said.

From there, the two went to Quentin Maddox's home in Churchton, where Rayman told police the two smoked marijuana and played a game that led to the shooting. Naditch said Rayman told police "he had shot Mr. Maddox as they ran through the house playing a Rambo-Hulk Hogan type of a game," but maintained it was an accident because he tripped coming down a set of stairs.

Rayman's attorney, Robert H. Waldman, said the Maddox family did not bail his client out of prison simply out of kindness, as a family member said in an interview after the shooting.

"There is a reason he was busted out of jail," Waldmansaid outside the courtroom. "There is a reason he was in that house,and there is a reason there was a gun present. Nobody knows what went on in that house but MacArthur Rayman."

Waldman would not be more specific, but said Rayman will tell the whole story at his sentencing hearing. He said he would argue the shooting was either self-defense or accidental.

After the slaying, Naditch said, Rayman took a 1989 Dodge Daytona that Maddox had been driving and went to a friend'shouse near Magothy Beach in Pasadena, where he removed the gun used in the shooting and gave it to another man.

He and his friend, Michael Wayne Lowe Jr., 18, of Pasadena, drove to a nearby parking lot, where they left the Dodge. Both then drove to the State Police barracks in Glen Burnie, where Rayman was planning to retrieve clothes taken when he was jailed, police said.

Police said he and Lowe were sitting on the front steps of the police station when Lt. Scott Suddith, an arson investigator, walked by. Suddith, who was looking to arrest Rayman on arson charges, had learned of Rayman's release and was atthe station to pick up a photograph of him.

Lowe and Rayman were charged with arson and taken to the Western District police station in Odenton. Eight hours later, Rayman also was charged with murder.

Rayman also pleaded guilty yesterday to two burglaries and setting atwo-alarm fire on May 28 that caused $170,000 damage to a home in the 400 block of Riverside Drive in Pasadena.

Assistant State's Attorney Joseph Reina told the court that Rayman was drinking liquor while searching the home with a lighted candle, looking for things to steal. He said Lowe would testify that Rayman tried to light a wall witha cigarette lighter, but when that didn't take, he used the candle.

Waldman said the fire was not set intentionally, but Rayman may have accidentally started the fire by igniting spilled vodka with the flame from the candle.

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