Bruce Weinstein, aka Agent Orange, is an accountant with a...

SUNDAY SNAPSHOTS

January 05, 1992|By Mary Corey

Bruce Weinstein, aka Agent Orange, is an accountant with a crushing hobby

He crunches numbers by day, bodies by night.

Such is the life -- or double life, as the case may be -- for Bruce Weinstein, Pikesville accountant and professional masked wrestler.

A white-collar anomaly in the world of wrestling, he relishes having the chance to cut loose after a hard day's work.

"Picking somebody up over your head and throwing them down is a great release of tension," he says with a devilish laugh.

Although he's been interested in the sport since childhood, he didn't begin competing until he tipped the scales at 215 pounds several years ago. "My friends all told me I was crazy," says Mr. Weinstein, who declines to give his age.

As his fatigue-wearing alter ego, Agent Orange, he's participated in more than 500 matches along the East Coast in the last five years.

His dream is to wrestle in the big leagues one day, but for now he satisfies himself with having met one of his idols.

"The most exciting thing," he says, "was getting to meet Andre the Giant . . . face to navel." When young women tell Earldine Williams about their fights with boyfriends, missed curfews or failed tests, she sometimes wonders whether the person she's talking to is herself.

At least the teen-ager she once was. The one who got suspended from school and had two children before turning 18.

But now life is different for the West Baltimore mother. For the last year, she's been a leading volunteer with the Baltimore Urban League, participating in the Outreach to Outreach program that gives young African-American women information about preventing AIDS, teen pregnancy and drug abuse.

Once a week, she leads discussion groups in Westport, weaving tales from her own life into sessions.

"I hope I can get to them, so they won't get into the trouble I did," says the 18-year-old who lives with her mother, sister and two infants.

Inspired by her work with adolescents, she's considering entering college this fall.

She says, "Everybody tells me I have a good mouth, so I think I want to be a lawyer."

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