Chronicling A Year's Worth Of Happenings

December 29, 1991|By LAURA CHARLES

YEAR IN REVIEW: Every year about this time, we order a double cheese pizza, crack open a six-pack of Diet Pepsi, don our reading specs and get down to the task of sifting through a year's worth of our columns. It always perks us up to read about your comings and goings throughout the year, and it's doubly nice to share them with you once again. So at the close of 1991, we invite you to take a stroll down memory lane. As always, thanks for the memories.

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DOUBLE TAKES: A new agency opened in January that represented celebrity look-alikes called Reflections Promotional and Entertainment Agency. The list of faux personalities included everyone from Paul Hogan's Crocodile Dundee to Queen Elizabeth II, although pop singer Cher was one of the most requested. (But not in Sonny Bono's house!)

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BLACK-TIE DEBUT: Channel 45's "News at Ten" debuted to Baltimore audiences on June 3 with a Hollywood-type approach. All the newsies marked their on-the-air debut by wearing tuxedos. Don't know if they were rentals, though.

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BUTCHERING AN ACT: The Roland Park Centennial Celebration held a reunion in June at St. Mary's Seminary for friends and former residents of the neighborhood. The entertainment? The butchers from Eddie's Supermarket who lip-synced a routine. Such hams.

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THE O'S ZONE: In January, rock singer Joan Jett, who later in the year belted out a riveting emotional "Star-Spangled Banner" at the Orioles' last game at Memorial Stadium, was one of the first to turn out for the Orioles Fantasy Camp in Sarasota, Fla., joining about 100 other hard-core fans. Joan, a left-handed hitter, was reported to have a lot of "pop" in her bat.

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A LITTLE DEPP'LL DO YA: Television and movie star Johnny "Cry Baby" Depp was spied checking out real estate prospects in the Big Crab with perennial sweetie, actress Winona Ryder. The Comedy Factory Outlet's Gard Jones joked that Depp had been signed to do the Elvis Presley story. "They're calling it 21 Jump Suits!"

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BOOK SMARTS: Howard County residents Eileen Buckholtz and Ruth Glick, who publish romance novels under the pen name Rebecca York, released "Shattered Vows," their second romantic suspense tome set in Baltimore. Sounds familiar. . . . Locally based author Harrison Livingstone, whose controversial book "High Treason" made the New York Times best-seller list, launched a new book called "Cry of the Invisible," a collection of writings of those who've been homeless or in mental institutions. . . . Baltimore writer Caroline Miller, whose first book, "My Name is Caroline," came out in paperback in March, appeared on the TV show, "To Tell the Truth". . . . Marketing pros Gwynn and Bob Willis co-authored a book called "Day Trips from Baltimore: Getaways Less Than 2 Hours Away."

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BY GEORGE: Maryland Public Television head writer and producer Dick George began taping humorous commentary for National Public Radio's "All Things Considered," heard by 7 million people worldwide. "I haven't had this much fun since 'Crabs,' " he said, referring to the satirical review he produced for MPT.

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OPENING REMARKS: Leilani's Restaurant's Leilani Wallace and husband Lloyd moved from West Barre Street to the former Scarlett O'Hara's on Antique Row. . . . Gin Nakagawa opened the Sushi Cafe on Thames Street in Fells Point, billing himself as a "sushiologist." . . . Chippendale promoter Brian Lazarus, also of Nard's Rock and Roll fame, joined with some chums to open Johnsons Bar and Grill at the old Schaefer's Pub on Calvert Street.

Harborplace added Johnny Rockets, a '40s-style hamburger joint, and Nickel City Grille, an upscale eatery, to its numerous restaurants. . . . Joey Chiu's Greenspring Inn opened in September and was an instant hit with Greenspring Valley fans. . . . The Walters Art Gallery's Hackerman House Museum of Asian Art opened in May with an elegant black-tie fete catered by the Classic Catering People, who also opened the Pavilion Restaurant there (open for lunch and private parties).

In Fells Point, Chuck Doering expanded his John Stevens Ltd. to include a garden area and waitresses. . . . Shortly after Jimmy Mikula and Tom Douglas opened their Weber's on Boston Street in June, they had an instant following. . . . Vern Liphart and Don Davis took over the former Flamingos on Eager and Charles, redecorated it, added pool tables and a piano bar and renamed it Central Station.

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MARYLAND-BASED author Tom Clancy let it be known that he wanted no part of the movie "Patriot Games," starring Harrison Ford, which he claimed had absolutely nothing to do with the book he'd penned by the same name. Actor Ford would thrill Annapolitans in December when he shot scenes from the movie there.

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