Schiller's abuses milder, counsel says OLYMPICS

December 19, 1991

An independent counsel informed senior officials of the United States Olympic Committee yesterday that his investigation of Harvey Schiller, the committee's executive director, found that Schiller had violated the USOC's Statement of Principle, which forbids officers and staff members from using their positions for material gain.

But the conclusions reached by the counsel, Arnold I. Burns, were mild compared with those in Burns' report last month on Robert Helmick, the former USOC president. Burns determined that Helmick, who resigned before the report was presented, had blatantly used his office for financial gain.

"I'd say Harvey was a little beat up, but it was nowhere as bad as Helmick got it," The New York Times quoted one member of the USOC executive committee as saying. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because the full report of approximately 20 pages was scheduled to be made public today in New York.

The incidents cited include two requests by Schiller for ski passes: one of the United States Ski Federation and the other of a group involved in trying to bring the Olympic Festival to Denver. Schiller received the first pass but not the second.

* Officials said the announced breakup of the Soviet Union would not result in a flood of extra athletes at the 1992 Summer Olympics.

"For now, the Soviets have agreed to send one team of 643 athletes. But whether it's one team or 10 teams, the number of athletes stays the same," Barcelona (Spain) Olympics operations chief Pedro Fontana told foreign correspondents.

* Former Syracuse basketball star Leo Rautins announced he intends to play for Lithuania at the 1992 Olympics.

Rautins, who was born and raised in Toronto, cited lack of financial and public support and a "haphazard" approach by Basketball Canada as reasons for joining the recently liberated Baltic state.

His parents were born in Lithuania.

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