Here are summaries of some recent Computing product...

REVIEWS

December 16, 1991|By From Knight-Ridder Financial Service

Here are summaries of some recent Computing product reviews. Each product is rated on a scale of one to four, with one computer indicating poor and four indicating excellent:

Dynamic Memory Control, for PC or compatible running DOS 2.0 or later. $79.95. From Adlersparre & Associates Inc., 501-1803 Douglas St., Victoria, British Columbia, Canada V8T 5C3. (604) 384-1118.

QAPlus, for PC or compatible. $159.95. From Diagsoft Inc., 5615 Scotts Valley Drive, Suite 140, Scotts Valley, Calif. 95066. (408) 438-8247.

Connections for Macintosh. $199 (or $149 through December from Heizer Software (800) 888-7667. From Concentrix Technology Inc., 1875 S. Grant St., Suite 760, San Mateo, Calif. 94402. (415) 358-8600.

Dynamic Memory Control is a utility program that makes it easier to load and unload software drivers and programs from memory. This lets you customize your PC's use of memory. It works as a complement to memory managers such as QEMM and 386MAX.

QAPlus is a diagnostic program that tests a PC's processor, memory, disk drives, keyboard, ports, video adapter and just about all other parts. Neither program is a must-have for individuals, who can use less expensive shareware utilities. Both could be wonderful for anyone who builds, tests, configures or supports dozens to thousands of PCs.

Connections is a Personal Information Manager for the Macintosh. It helps you keep and organize a to-do list, a schedule for appointments and reminders and a telephone call log. It also keeps a phone-address directory and any quick notes you want to type. It comes closer than most PIMs to being a practical replacement for the paper organizer. However, it is more complex to learn than I would like and demands lots of RAM (4MB) and processor speed.

Dynamic Memory Control

Rating: 3 computers

QAPlus

Rating: 3 computers

Connections

Rating: 3 computers

(These are reviews of shareware programs for IBM and #i compatible computers. Shareware programs are available from computer bulletin boards and computer clubs. Users try them, then pay a fee to register them if they decide to use them regularly.)

Disk Manager. If you're familiar with programs such as Xtree, you'll feel right at home with Disk Manager. You can copy, move and delete files, and you can view and edit text files, just like its zTC rich shrink-wrap cousins. Look for version 2.2 or higher on bulletin boards.

VDE. This word-processing program is ideal for editing or producing text files you want to share with others. It's menu-driven, fast and uses very little memory. The VDE stands for Video Display Editor. You can open windows to handle several documents at once, do searches, count words and program macros. Look for version 1.52 or higher on bulletin boards.

Valet. It blanks the screen and parks the hard drive head after a predetermined period. Screen blanking protects against phosphor burn-in if you happen to leave the computer unattended for a long time. Parking the heads protects against

destruction of data if the computer is jolted.

KBFix. This will help you fine-tune your keyboard, adjust the speed of key repeats, have an on-screen display to tell you whether the CAPS Lock, NUM Lock and SCROLL Lock keys are on.

Sitris. This is a Tetris-like game that does a lot of the things its model does, which means you stack odd-shaped tiles on top of each other. For the money (it's free), you can't go wrong.

Gomoku. This is an old Japanese game brought to life on computers.

Matchem. Program tests your memory as you flash on "Concentration"-like squares and later try to match them.

MLloyd. This takes one of those old plastic number puzzles, where you try to put all the numbers in a row, with only one blank space. A great time killer.

(For copies of all 12 of these stocking stuffers, send $15, plus tax for Californians, to Shareware, P.O. Box 7037, Long Beach, Calif. 90807. Or call (310) 595-6870. A shareware catalog on a disk costs $2. Please indicate 5.25- or 3.5-inch disks.)

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