SuperSonics waive Dailey after disputeThe Seattle...

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December 12, 1991

SuperSonics waive Dailey after dispute

The Seattle SuperSonics placed guard Quintin Dailey on waivers because of what coach K.C. Jones called a dispute over playing time. Dailey had appeared in 11 of the team's 19 games, averaging 9.0 minutes and 2.8 points.

Dailey, 30, a Cardinal Gibbons graduate, was in his third year with the Sonics after three years with the Los Angeles Clippers and four with the Chicago Bulls. He said he plans to sign with a team in the newly formed Global Basketball League and indicated he would like to someday work as an NBA referee.

* The Boston Celtics and the television and radio stations also owned by the Boston Celtics Limited Partnership are for sale for $200 million, The Boston Globe reported, based on information from two unidentified sources.

Tennis

Guy Forget led the way into the quarterfinals of the $6 million Compaq Grand Slam Cup yesterday in Munich, Germany, with a 6-3, 6-3 victory over Jamie Yzaga.

Forget was down, 0-3, to his Peruvian opponent in the second set, then won six consecutive games to take the match.

American David Wheaton moved into the quarterfinals by defeating Dutchman Paul Haarhuis, 1-6, 6-3, 6-2. American Aaron Krickstein lost to Todd Woodbridge of Australia, 6-3, 6-3.

* Harry Hopkins, a district judge in Fort Worth, Texas, has ordered Martina Navratilova and her former companion, Judy Nelson, back to court because they have failed to settle a palimony suit. He gave the estranged couple three months to settle the suit.

Football

Illinois coach John Mackovic says he wants to be able to tell his players today whether he will take the vacant coaching job at the University of Texas.

Mackovic appeared to be the leading candidate to succeed David McWilliams, who resigned last week. Two other coaches reportedly under consideration -- Dick Sheridan of North Carolina State and Bill Curry of Kentucky -- said they weren't interested.

* South Carolina State and coach Willie Jeffries will abide by sanctions contained in an NCAA report concerning rule violations while Jeffries was at Howard, S.C. State president Albert E. Smith said. Under the NCAA ruling, Jeffries will not be allowed to coach in postseason competition.

* The Northwood Recreation Center 11-13 Pop Warner team will play for the national title Saturday in Jacksonville, Fla., against a team from Dallas.

Women's soccer

Mount St. Mary's will begin varsity intercollegiate competition in women's soccer next fall, athletic director Tom Balistrere said. The decision concludes a six-month study that began when the college announced it was dropping field hockey. Officials had narrowed their replacement choices to women's soccer and volleyball.

Boxing

Marion Superior Court Judge Patricia J. Gifford turned down a defense attorney's request to delay the rape trial of Mike Tyson, scheduled to start Jan. 27. The lawyers had said they needed more time to prepare their case.

Hockey

Mark Messier became the third-highest-paid player in the NHL when he signed a reported five-year, $13 million contract with the New York Rangers. His salary places him behind ex-teammate Wayne Gretzky of the Los Angeles Kings, who earns $3 million, and Mario Lemieux of the Stanley Cup-champion Pittsburgh Penguins, who gets $2.38 million.

Stadiums

Plans are under way to tear down Exhibition Stadium in Toronto and replace it with an arena for concerts, hockey, basketball and other professional sports. The proposed arena, which would seat about 22,000, would be big enough to accommodate the NHL's Toronto Maple Leafs or an NBA franchise.

College basketball

Ian Dale, an Arizona State reserve freshman, has been placed on three years' probation after pleading guilty to attempted sexual abuse and assault. He avoided trial on a more serious charge of sexual abuse by entering into a plea bargain Tuesday, but is required to register as a sex offender in Maricopa County.

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