600 help Sheppard Pratt celebrate its centennial

Sylvia Badger

December 03, 1991|By Sylvia Badger

SHEPPARD PRATT has always been a class act, professionally and socially. At one of its recent social events, more than 600 people were celebrating the hospital's centennial in a setting that took them back 100 years.

Thanks to the leadership of real estate czar Jim O'Connor, the corporate chair of the gala, more than $150,000 was raised for Centennial House, a quarter-way house for patients. Maryland artists Joseph Sheppard, Grace Hartigan, Raoul Middleman and Frederick Kail displayed works depicting the evening's theme, "Celebrating the Human Spirit."

Guests included Dr. and Mrs. Emile A. Bendit, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Lansburgh, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Lazarus, Dr. and Mrs. Robert Gibson, Dr. Margaret Sherrard, Leonard Hanberry, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Cardin, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Minor, Dr. Byron Forbush, Mrs. Joan Merritt, Ms. Jess Gersky, Elmont Dayton and Drs. Steven and Margaret Sharfstein, who joined in for the old-time fun and games, such as having photos taken in front of antique carriages, dressed up in ribbons and flowers for an 1890s look. Pianist Mel Spears entertained.

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Scott Brady, WMIX radio personality, will be the first to don Santa's outfit for the Celebrity Santathon, beginning Friday at 4 p.m. and running through Sunday at the Harborplace Amphitheater. For 25 hours this weekend, 25 area celebrities will donate their time to raise money for the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. Money is raised from photo sales, so be sure to have your picture taken with your favorite celeb.

Others on the Santa roster are Randy Milligan and Mark Williamson, Baltimore Orioles; Col. Joe Newman and Maj. Ray Raffensberger, Baltimore City Police Department; Guy Reinbold, executive chef at Stouffer Harborplace Hotel, and Stuart Simms, City States Attorney.

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I had a delightful conversation with Ruth Fox, who declares herself 76 years young and who has been writing children's stories for 30 of those years. She's excited that Uffington Productions Inc. has used four of her well-researched nature stories to make "A Story for Every Season," two cassette tapes for children. Fox says the stories, aimed at age 4 and up, teach children to respect nature and, in return, humans.

Trish MacDonald, dinner theater and summer stock actress, narrates the stories about "Amos the Mountain Boy" and the hardships of the mountain people and their use and respect of nature; "Oakie the Wonder Tree," which is about being unselfish; "The Seashell that Almost Did" teaches that nothing in nature is wasted, and then there's the rambunctious beaver named Willy, who tries to stop Fall from becoming Winter. Price for the two cassettes is $13.95. They are being carried at 19 area bookstores and the Baltimore Museum of Art and the National Aquarium. Oh yes, Fox tells me that she sent cassettes to England's Prince Harry and Prince William.

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Special best wishes to Tracy Weinberg and Greg Harris, who combined their 11 years of experience at Image Dynamics to form Weinberg Harris and Associates, the city's newest public relations/marketing special events firm. Their offices are at Scarlett Place.

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"The Day It All Began," a historical account of Pearl Harbor, the most infamous day in the history of World War II, can be seen all week on WBAL-TV news. Pat Minarcin will interview local World War II vets, including Seaman Frank Berry and Ohmer Clark, and Army Lt. George Carter . . .

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"One New Toy" is all WPOC radio wants, so they can deliver at least 1,000 toys to 18 homeless shelters in the Baltimore area. Toys for infants to 17 years of age will be wrapped and delivered to the shelters by WPOC staffers and Cub Scout Pack 372 from Essex. Call Sheila Silverstein at 366-3693 for information on the drop-off points.

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