Some of the findings

November 21, 1991|By Mary Maushard

Here are some of the findings in "Speaking Of Kids, A National Survey of Children and Parents," released today by the National Commission on Children:

* In 70 percent of the more than 1,700 households surveyed, families ate dinner together at least five times a week.

* Sixty-five percent of the parents interviewed said they have "excellent" relationships with their children, while an additional 32 percent said they have "good" relationships.

* Sixty-two percent of the parents said they and their children attended religious services at least once a month, while 29 percent of those parents reported teaching a Sunday School class in the last year.

* Thirty percent of the parents would like "a lot more" time with their children and 29 percent would like "a little more" time with them. Thirty-nine percent of the parents say they have the "right amount" of time while 2 percent would prefer "less time" with their families.

* Among mothers who are employed 34 to 40 hours a week, 29 percent of them said they have "the right amount" of time with their families; 66 percent of the mothers who are not employed say they have "the right amount" of time with their families.

* Fifteen percent of the children whose mothers are not employed would like more time with them; 20 percent of the children whose mothers work 34 to 40 hours a week want more time with them.

* Forty-four percent of the children in two-parent families (not stepfamilies) admire their mothers, while 52 percent admire their fathers. Thirty-nine percent of the children in single-parent families admire their mothers and 20 percent admire their fathers.

* Eighteen percent of the children living apart from their fathers have not seen them in five years.

* Seven percent of the children in intact and single-parent families say they are lonely; 8 percent of the children from stepfamilies and 29 percent of the children being reared by someone other than a parent are lonely.

* Eighteen percent of parents worry "a lot" that their children will use drugs; 19 percent worry that their children will get acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and 23 percent worry that their children will be beaten up, attacked or molested.

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