Top Rank to require AIDS testingTop Rank, the biggest...

Sports briefly

November 15, 1991

Top Rank to require AIDS testing

Top Rank, the biggest boxing promoter in the United States, said yesterday that, beginning in January, it will require all fighters on its cards to be tested for HIV, the virus that leads to AIDS. Promoter Bob Arum said mandatory testing will be written into all Top Rank contracts. He said he doesn't expect any boxer to challenge the stipulation.

Only Nevada requires AIDS testing for boxers who fight in that state. Arum's plan calls for boxers to be tested within six months. New Jersey requires that the referee and corner men wear rubber gloves to protect them from blood, but "it doesn't protect the opponent because the opponent can only be protected if the man he is facing is free of the virus," Arum said.

Tennis

Pete Sampras beat his U.S. Davis Cup partner Andre Agassi, 6-3, 1-6, 6-3, and Boris Becker won the crowd and the match against Wimbledon champion Michael Stich at the ATP Tour World Championships in Frankfurt, Germany. Despite the loss, Agassi, the defending champion who dropped to 1-1, could clinch a place in the semifinals. Sampras, 2-0, also will have to wait until today to know if he made the final four.

That was because Becker's 7-6 (7-1), 6-3 victory over his German compatriot opened the way for a three-way tie atop the group. Becker is 1-1, and Stich (0-2) was eliminated. In final group matches today, Sampras plays Becker and Agassi meets Stich. If three players end with 2-1 records, the tie would be broken by percentage of sets won.

Ivan Lendl, already sure of a place in the semifinals, kept his record perfect by beating Karel Novacek, 6-2, 6-2. The other semifinal berth from his group will be decided today in the match between top-seeded Jim Courier and Guy Forget.

* Second-seeded Gabriela Sabatini breezed into the semifinals of the Virginia Slims of Philadelphia with a 6-3, 6-0 victory over No. 6 seed Conchita Martinez.

Sabatini will play the winner of today's match between No. 4 seed Jennifer Capriati and No. 7 seed Manuela Maleeva-Fragniere. Maleeva-Fragniere defeated Amy Frazier, 6-3, 6-3, to earn her meeting with Capriati, while No. 8 seed Zina Garrison defeated Nicole Provis, 6-4, 6-4, and will play top-ranked Monica Seles in the quarterfinals.

* Top-seeded Katerina Maleeva of Bulgaria gained the semifinals of the $150,000 Jell-O Tennis Classic in Indianapolis with a 6-3, 6-3 victory over Susan Sloane-Lundy.

Other quarterfinal winners were No. 4 seed Radka Zrubakova of Czechoslovakia, 6-4, 6-4 over Linda Harvey-Wild, and Audra Keller by 6-2, 6-3 over Petra Thoren of Finland. Zrubakova will meet Keller in today's semifinals.

College football

James Madison coach Rip Scherer said he will withdraw his name from consideration for the same job at Tulane if former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke wins Louisiana's gubernatorial election.

Golf

Mike Hulbert moved into the lead after two rounds of the $750,000 Kapalua (Hawaii) International with a 4-under-par 69 for a one-shot lead over Steve Pate.

College basketball

A University of Texas assistant coach said he did nothing illegal in withholding some meal money from Longhorns players during the past two seasons, saving it in his freezer to give out when he thought it was more needed. The Austin American-Statesman reported that coach Jamie Ciampaglio's handling of the money has led to an investigation by Texas' internal audit department. None of the allegations involve potential NCAA violations, the newspaper said.

Ciampaglio conceded that he did not hand out the meal money according to school procedures, but he said he eventually always gave the players the exact amount allowed. During the past two years, he said, he saved a portion of the money owed the players for post-game meals at home and gave it out on road trips, partly as a motivational tool and partly as a way to cope with higher road expenses.

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