Shoulder injury to cost Saints' Hebert 2 games LHC '

November 09, 1991

The New Orleans Saints will be without starting quarterback Bobby Hebert for at least two more games, including tomorrow's game against the San Francisco 49ers.

Hebert was examined Thursday in Los Angeles for right shoulder injuries affecting his throwing arm.

Dr. Frank Jobe confirmed Hebert had a bruised rotator cuff muscle and a sprained shoulder.

"It sounds like three weeks to me," coach Jim Mora said. "But again, as with all injuries, nothing is etched in stone for a minimum or maximum time."

Jobe, one of the country's leading authorities on rotator cuff injuries, recommended Hebert refrain from throwing for at least one week. After that, he can begin making short tosses and gradually work up to longer distances.

Jobe's examination concurs with the findings of Saints team doctors.

Hebert's injuries kept him on the sidelines last week against the Los Angeles Rams.

Backup Steve Walsh will start tomorrow, with second-year quarterback Mike Buck in reserve. Punter Tommy Barnhardt likely would be the team's emergency quarterback.

Mora said Hebert would not be placed on injured reserve.

* GIANTS: Linebacker Lawrence Taylor said he wants to know if it's true what a former lover is saying about him: that he fathered her 4-month-old son.

So Taylor said he's undergoing blood tests.

The Pro Bowl linebacker didn't deny he had an affair with the woman, identified by the New York Daily News as Wendy Robinson, a 27-year-old insurance claims representative.

He said the affair happened in September 1990, when he was separated from his wife, Linda, the mother of his three children. The couple has since reconciled.

* COLTS: Indianapolis filled Eric Dickerson's spot on the roster by re-signing running back Bruce Perkins, who played in seven games for the Colts before he was released Oct. 18.

Dickerson was suspended for four weeks on Thursday for refusing to practice.

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