Martin Marietta unit gains status in restructuring

October 30, 1991|By Ted Shelsby

Martin Marietta Corp.'s Maryland-based Aero & Naval Systems division will report directly to senior management at corporate headquarters in Bethesda beginning Friday, as part of a corporate restructuring announced yesterday.

The move is aimed at streamlining the company's operations. A spokesman, Al Kanhi, likened the restructuring to the maturing of Aero & Naval Systems to the point that headquarters "felt that it could go out on its own because of the new core businesses it has developed."

The division, which includes operations in Middle River, Glen Burnie and Riviera Beach, Fla., has been a unit of Martin's Electronics, Information & Missiles Group, which is based in Orlando, Fla.

Norman R. Augustine, Martin's chairman and chief executive, said that the company plans to develop Aero & Naval Systems as Martin's primary unit serving the Navy, while enhancing commercial production efficiencies.

Mr. Augustine said that Aero & Naval unit was made part of the Orlando-run operations a few years ago to accelerate this effort. "It now makes sense to remove a layer of management from Aero & Naval Systems," he said yesterday.

The division's major programs include a rocket-launching system for use on Navy ships, towed arrays to detect and track submarines, the MK 50 torpedo and fan reversers that slow commercial jetliners after they touch down on a runway.

With the help of a major infusion of engineering brain power from Orlando during the early 1980s, Martin's Middle River complex has become a technology leader in robotics. Its work in this area includes the development of remote control equipment for use in cleaning nuclear waste sites and a golf-cart-size vehicle to be used by the military for surveillance and reconnaissance missions.

Another unmanned autonomous vehicle developed at the Baltimore County plant is designed to unload ammunition on the battlefield.

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