Autopsy finds fugitive killed himself, police say

September 25, 1991|By Richard Irwin | Richard Irwin,Evening Sun Staff

An autopsy yesterday on the body of Andre Edward Lunn, a murder suspect who shot it out with police and the FBI in an East Baltimore rowhouse, has revealed that Lunn took his own life, police said.

The autopsy report said Lunn died from a self-inflicted bullet wound to the left side of the head with one of two 9mm semi-automatic handguns he used while exchanging gunfire with police from inside a house in the 1300 block of Wirton St.

Police had said they thought the fatal shot was fired by a police officer.

However, police said yesterday, a bullet removed from Lunn's head came from one of his guns.

Lunn, who was on the state's 10 Most Wanted List, was being sought in a 1989 murder in northeast Baltimore. City police traced him to the Wirton Street house Monday night after receiving a tip.

The FBI also was seeking Lunn on a warrant charging him with unlawful flight to avoid prosecution in the murder.

Lunn was found hiding in the basement of a relative's home about 7 p.m. and for two hours held police and the FBI at bay while they tried to talk him out.

When a Quick Response Team arrived and was replacing several detectives, Lunn ran up the basement stairs during the confusion, firing one of the handguns.

More than 20 rounds were fired by Lunn, Officer Frank Wagner of the hostage negotiating team and FBI Agent Michael Garrett.

During the brief exchange of fire, Garrett was shot in the right foot and Detective James Webb was injured when bullets fired by Lunn splintered a door. Both were treated at University of Maryland Medical Center yesterday and released.

Police retreated from the house after the shooting erupted and came back in later. When they entered the basement, they found Lunn lying at the bottom of the stairs.

Originally, police said a bullet fired by Wagner hit Lunn in the forehead, killing him instantly and causing him to fall back down the stairs.

However, the autopsy showed that Lunn killed himself when he fired a 9mm Glock-17 into the left side of his head.

It was unclear from the autopsy details made available whether the shot Wagner fired also hit Lunn.

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