Town Closes Street

Carroll capsule

September 18, 1991

MOUNT AIRY — With the agreement of all but two Main Street businesses, the Town Council agreed to close Main Street during the two-day Fall Festival Oct. 5 and 6.

Festival chairman Irene Hubert told the council at the Sept. 9 session the street should be closed as a safety factor. Organizers expect the crowd to reach about 5,000.

"We had 59 booths last year," she said. "Already this year, we have 104."

The town will post detour signs and run a shuttle bus to the festival area. State police and the sheriff's department will assist.

In other news, Mayor Gerald Johnson appointed Travis Norwood chairman of the Centennial Committee.

Following two resignations, he also appointed Catherine Dickmon to the Recycling Committee and Thomas J. Maestri to Recreation and Parks.

STUDENT ENROLLMENT UP

Carroll educators reported there are 625 more students in the district this year. Enrollment is 22,366 students, prekindergarten through 12thgrade, school officials said.

Enrollment in most schools went up,said Edwin L. Davis, director of pupil services/special programs.

He said 75 students remain unaccounted. Davis said that number is not unusual for the second week of school. Students may have transferred to other school districts or private schools or other reasons, he said.

WMC ENROLLMENT DOWN

DATELINE: WESTMINSTER

WESTMINSTER -- Western Maryland College's overall enrollment, including graduate and undergraduate students, dropped to 1,830 for the 1991-1992 academic year, WMC officials reported.

There were 393 more students during the 1990-1991 year, in which 2,223 graduate and undergraduate students were enrolled. There are 89 fewer undergraduate and 304 fewer graduate students this year, WMC officials said.

Undergraduates this year total 1,226 and graduate students total 604.

New students consistedof 282 entering freshmen and 88 transfer students, up 109 students from the previous year. There were 28 minority students, 18 of whom were blacks, and 33 international students.

SCHOOLS OUT EARLY

Like other Maryland school districts, Carroll closed its schools early because of yesterday's heat. Carroll students were released one hour early, school officials said.

High temperatures and humidity can make about half of the district's 32 schools uncomfortable for students and staff because the buildings have no air conditioning, school officials said.

Prior to closing schools, Carroll staff received dozens of calls from parents concerned about the heat. After closing early, the staff received calls complaining about the inconvenience to working parents, who must adjust day care and work schedules.

SCHOOLS OUT EARLY

Like other Maryland school districts, Carroll closed its schools early because of yesterday's heat. Carroll students were released one hour early, school officials said.

High temperatures and humidity can make about half of the district's 32 schools uncomfortable for students and staff because the buildings have no air conditioning, school officials said.

Prior to closing schools, Carroll staff received dozens of calls from parents concerned about the heat. After closing early, the staff received calls complaining about the inconvenience to working parents, who must adjust day care and work schedules.

FARM ZONING OK'D

A 91-acre collection of three farms outside Manchester were approved for inclusion in the state's Farmland Preservation Program yesterday by the Planning and Zoning Commission.

However, the three farms were rejected earlier this month for inclusion by the Agricultural Preservation Advisory Board, after that board determined the farms constituted too small a parcel.

The planning commission, by recommending inclusion, now sends the application to the county commissioners, who, if they approve, must refer the matter to the state for final approval.

The Farmland Preservation Program is a state program that purchases development rights from farmers in order to keep agricultural lands intact. The state usually does not approve parcels of less than 100 acres for acceptance into the program.

Because the planning commission wanted to give the three farms a chance at approval, members voted for inclusion. Had the commission voted against the farms, inclusion would have been impossible.

BLOOD DRIVES PLANNED

The supply of certain types of blood at Carroll CountyGeneral Hospital has dropped to dangerously low levels in the last several weeks because of a regionwide decline in donors, said the hospital's blood bank supervisor.

The shortage creates a risk for emergency patients who have lost blood in accidents and others who need transfusions, said Gertrude Redding, who characterized the problem as "serious."

CCGH has been especially short of O-negative and B-positive, relatively uncommon blood types, said Redding.

The hospital does not have the staff or the facilities to conduct its own blood drive, Redding said.

CCGH relies on the Red Cross for about 90 percent of its blood supply.

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