Bible rewriting, amusing pudding and panhandlers

ROGER SIMON

September 16, 1991|By ROGER SIMON

Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:

Elmer A. Rosenberger, Baltimore: I can assure you that if you continue to feel as you do, you are going to burn in Hell, and I will not be there alongside of you, but I will be looking down on you burning in Hell.

The First Amendment was made by Human Beings. The Ten Commandments were given by God to Moses, or perhaps you don't believe this.

COMMENT: I believe it. But which commandment says: Thou Shalt Always Agree With Elmer A. Rosenberger?

Paul Roda, Lakewood, Colorado: In your column, you address the mixed emotions that confront us when dealing with panhandlers.

I happen to have trouble walking by any of them without feeling compelled to help. I believe these people to be an opportunity for us to withhold our judgment and act solely out of compassion.

COMMENT: I think you have a good point. And next time I see a panhandler, I'm going to treat him with much more compassion. I'm going to stop and give him a quarter and say: "Now which bank did you use to be president of?"

Miriam Goldstein, Baltimore: I enclose a restaurant review that says: "But we enjoyed . . . an amusing steamed rice pudding for dessert."

Where are The Sun editors? Busy writing the corrections column every day?

Have you ever been amused by a pudding?

COMMENT: No, but I've been tickled by a tuber or two.

L. Garrison, Baltimore: Is anyone -- has anyone ever -- tried to see it that Raoul Wallenberg was freed? Shouldn't those 100,000 (or was it 200,000?) persons he saved have knocked themselves out to free him? How could it be that of all those people he risked his life to save, no one remembered him once they were saved?

It really is obscene that this man should be forgotten and left to such a fate.

COMMENT: Raoul Wallenberg is not forgotten. His memory is not only honored in Israel at Yad Vashem, the Holocaust $H memorial, but there is an international Wallenberg committee dedicated to finding out what really happened to him.

And in the last year alone, by the way, The Sun has carried five stories mentioning Wallenberg.

Wallenberg, a Swedish diplomat and a Christian, saved 20,000 or so Hungarian Jews in the Budapest ghetto in 1944-45 by issuing them Swedish passports.

In 1945, he was arrested by the Soviets as a spy and disappeared. After saying for years they knew nothing about his whereabouts, the Soviets claimed in 1957 that he died in Lubyanka prison, Moscow, of a heart attack in July 1947. But some people claim to have seen him alive and in captivity as late as the 1980s.

Only about a week ago, the KGB promised to let their agents break their traditional silence and cooperate with a joint Swedish-Soviet team to investigate Wallenberg's fate.

Though Wallenberg's relatives still believe he is alive (he would be 79 if that were so), even those who do not believe he could have survived would like to know with certainty what happened to him and, if he is dead, to locate his remains.

In any case, Wallenberg is far from forgotten, especially by those whom he risked his own life to save.

FTC Jeffrey T. Miller, Director, Environmental Health and Government Affairs, Lead Industries Association, New York: Exposure to lead -- and its regulation -- represents one of the most talked about health concerns in the nation today.

The Lead Industries Association is sponsoring its 13th Annual Conference for Physicians and Allied Health Professionals to be held Oct. 22-25 in Palm Springs, CA.

Because of the interest you have in following and reporting on this issue, the LIA cordially invites you to attend the conference. . . .

COMMENT: Gosh, I'd love to go. Who wouldn't love to go to Palm Springs in October? I just wonder how many "physicians and allied health professionals" would show up, however, if you held the conference in Pittsburgh.

Melis R. Edel, Baltimore: In your column you quote a Mr. Galeone opposing abortion]. Most would assume his quotation is from the Book of Matthew 25:42. But it is not. That passage does not mention babies. Is Mr. Galeone rewriting the Bible? In my opinion, that is unconscionable.

COMMENT: What? You can't rewrite the Bible to make it say whatever you want it to say? Since when?

Monroe Cornish, Baltimore: A full government investigation of John F. Kennedy's demise is in order.

COMMENT: Good suggestion, Monroe! And maybe we could call it the Warren Commission.

J. L. Holmes Jr., Baltimore: What with the haggling between the governor and the owner of the Orioles over the name for the new ballpark, I have a solution. The citizens of Baltimore were bypassed in building the ballpark downtown in an already congested area.

So call it: The Field of Schemes.

COMMENT: If they build it, we'll be numb.

S. A. Kalinich, Arnold: My Graduate Record Exam scores have arrived. I find myself in the top 5 percent verbally with a score of 700 and the top 9 percent analytically with a 710.

I'm sending a copy to you, because I didn't believe it myself at first. Now I'll just have to see what the University of Maryland thinks.

COMMENT: Don't get your hopes up.

They might want to know your time in the 40-yard -- and how good a move you have to the basket.

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