A plethora of textures

ART REVIEW

September 09, 1991|By Robert Haskins

Sculptures created by six Baltimore artists from a wide variety of materials make for mixed impressions in the exhibition "Shaping Space" at Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery.

The most remarkable works poetically exploit disparate, even contradictory, materials. In Scott T. Pina's "Denial," for instance, rough-hewn lumber is wrapped tightly in plastic with an imposing shape of sculpted steel around the wood, producing a dramatic effect.

No less compelling is D. Scott Cahlander's "Table Abstraction" in which an uneven, rectangular slab of concrete forms the base for a table-like shape. Mr. Cahlander provides a lyrical counterpoint to the image with stainless steel rods and a polished glass top, materials that appear manufactured and aesthetically "cooler" than the concrete.

Allyn Massey's "Balleen" -- a series of identical translucent Mylar rectangles hanging from a silvery rod at irregular distances -- is striking in its formal simplicity. Even so, the work would have benefited frommore careful and elaborate lighting.

"House of the Constellation," one of three steel sculptures by Chris Gavin, is ultimately disappointing. Large and brightly colored, the piece is a conglomeration of die-cut, cartoon-like illustrative images (including a house and a shooting star). However, its naive primitivism seems empty and forced.

By contrast, Mr. Gavin's "Noughts and Crosses" is much more successful. Here, the images themselves -- X's and O's in a tick-tack-toe grid -- evoke a rich network of associations, and the use of primitivism only enhances the effect.

The final offering, Jann Rosen-Queralt's "Walk Between," is a permanent site-specific installation situated outdoors between the Rosenberg and the new Meyerhoff Arts Center. A combination of landscaping and sculpture, it is deftly suited to the rugged area that it inhabits.

The exhibit runs through Oct. 20 in the Rosenberg Gallery in the lobby of Kraushaar auditorium, Goucher College. Call 337-6333.

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