Gordon K. Lewis, 72, a native of Wales who became a...

Deaths elsewhere

August 17, 1991

Gordon K. Lewis, 72, a native of Wales who became a leading expert on Caribbean politics, died yesterday in Puerto Rico after a long illness. He first went there to help write the island's constitution, which was adopted in 1952. He earned his doctorate in 1954 at Harvard University and returned to live in Puerto Rico. He joined the political science department at the University of Puerto Rico in the early 1950s and served from 1983 to 1987 as director of the university's Institute of Caribbean Studies. According to the university, he just completed a comprehensive book on the Caribbean, to be published by the Johns Hopkins University Press.

Chauncey Guy Suits, 86, a former director of research for General Electric Co. who helped develop the synthetic diamond-making process, died of cancer Wednesday in New York. He joined GE in 1930 and was a vice president and director of research from 1945 to 1965. He held 77 U.S. patents that covered a variety of devices and included block signal improvements, circuits for sequence-flashing electric signs, radio circuits, beacons, submarine signals, theater light dimmers and photo-electric relays. In 1962, he announced a new process that he said would facilitate the manufacture of synthetic diamonds, using a hydraulic press that could heat carbon up to 9,000 degrees Fahrenheit.

Paul R. Foster, 79, a member of Orson Welles' Mercury Theater in the 1930s, died Monday in Attica, Ind. After graduating from drama school in 1936, he toured the country with the Leslie Howard production of "Hamlet," directed by John Houseman. He then went to New York, where he performed in "Julius Caesar," directed by Welles. He later played the role of the apprentice in "Shoemaker's Holiday" and became a member of the Mercury Theater. He returned to his native Indiana in 1938.

John J. Abt, 87, a lawyer who as chief counsel to the U.S. Communist Party fought laws barring party members from

holding passports and federal jobs, died of a stroke Saturday in New York. He had worked in various branches of government and was a member of the Communist Party.

Gordon K. Lewis, 72, a native of Wales who became a leading expert on Caribbean politics, died yesterday in Puerto Rico after a long illness. He first went there to help write the island's constitution, which was adopted in 1952. He earned his doctorate in 1954 at Harvard University and returned to live in Puerto Rico. He joined the political science department at the University of Puerto Rico in the early 1950s and served from 1983 to 1987 as director of the university's Institute of Caribbean Studies. According to the university, he just completed a comprehensive book on the Caribbean, to be published by Johns Hopkins University Press.

Daniel Haberman, 58, a poet associated with the Poets' Corner at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York, died of lymphoma Aug. 8 in that city. The New York native was a resident of Lewisburg, W.Va. He wrote "The Furtive Wall," a book of poems published in 1982, and "Poems" (1977). In 1983 he helped establish the Poets' Corner, modeled on the one commemorating celebrated poets in Westminster Abbey in London, and he was one of its 12 electors until he died.

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