WPOC hosts Marie Osmond 98 Rock sets a cruise

Sylvia Badger

July 30, 1991|By Sylvia Badger

THE RAIN MAY have been good for the gardens, trees and bushes but, alas, not for Sylvia's column. I was going to tell you all about a five-hour sail on the Chesapeake Bay on a 55-foot boat, but that has been postponed until September, thanks to the rain.

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Baltimore country music station WPOC-FM is bringing Marie Osmond to town to entertain at the Maryland State Fair on Sept. 2 at 8:30 p.m. Osmond began singing when she was only 3 and had her first hit, "Paper Roses," at the age of 13. She's had a successful show-biz career but declares her heart is in country music. She'll be belting old favorites and a sprinkling of new, and the best part is that the concert is free with a paid admission to the fair.

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Another radio freebie takes place Friday at 7 a.m. 98 Rock fans are invited to come down to the Inner Harbor and go cruising with morning personalities Chris, Erika and Lopez on the Lady Baltimore. Tickets are free, but plan to arrive early, because they're expecting a crowd to show up for breakfast and to participate in their wild and woolly antics.

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If walls could talk, Weber's on Boston Street would have some wild stories to tell. Situated in the heart of Canton, Weber's colorful history includes being a '20s stag bar, a speakeasy, a gambling parlor and it is said that it was once a brothel.

The building was closed up for nearly 40 years, when Tom Douglas and Jim Mikula -- he also has an interest in Pierpont's -- decided to restore Weber's to its authentic condition. They worked with the Maryland Historic Trust, and the end product is well worth seeing. The beautiful hand-carved mahogany bar, marble fireplaces, patterned tin ceiling and original light fixtures are handsome, and the food being dished up looks as good as it tastes.

I lunched there recently with B-104's GM Jim Fox and Baltimore Arena's PR woman Edie Brown, both known to have discriminating taste buds. We shared a Greek salad with flank steak, Indonesian salad with grilled chicken and a Maryland sandwich.

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Anyone who knows Chuck and Linda Bishop, Colony Auto Sales in Remington, knows that they are true Frank Sinatra buffs. Chuck Bishop estimates he's attended at least 25 Sinatra concerts and says that Sinatra's recent Merriweather Post performance was the best. The Bishops rented a big white Lincoln limo, which took them and their friends, WCAO radio's R.C. Allen and his wife, Judy, to see a living legend in style.

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Last Saturday's Hits for the Homeless, hosted by WMAR-TV during the Orioles/Mariners game, raised $70,000 in pledges to help Maryland's homeless. That's a 30 per cent increase over last year's telethon....

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Jennifer Berk has left her marketing job at the aquarium for what she hopes will be a bigger fish to fry. She's taken the job as director of marketing for Laurie Schwartz at the Downtown Partnership....

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Congratulations to Ina Fleisher who has been named assistant director of Tourism/Marketing and Vistors Services for the Baltimore Convention and Visitors Association. First and foremost on her agenda is to market Baltimore as a tourist destination.

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Certainly Baltimoreans know that Memorial Stadium will shut its doors this fall. And I've enjoyed the "Thanks for the memories" stuff the Orioles have done. But, quite honestly, some of may best Memorial Stadium memories had to do with the Baltimore Colts, too. And I haven't heard anyone salute their glory days at the stadium. If I were part of the Orioles hierarchy, I would consider inviting members of the Old Colts to the stadium for a special salute before the doors close.

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I'm told that shoppers at the Dulaney Plaza Shopping Center in Towson were recently treated to Korean dances, martial arts and fireworks. Many thought it was a Chinese New Year celebration, but in this case it was the grand opening of Ming's, a snazzy new Asian gallery.

If you're into the Oriental motif, there are more than 3,000 items housed in this delightful new store, which represent about 5,000 years of history and tradition. The shop is owned by Jacquelyn and Robert Schingeck, of International Art and Antique Importers Inc. Robert Schingeck's interest in Oriental art began during his military service in Korea, and since that time he has become an art historian and an expert on antiques. I'm told that whatever your dynasty, the Schingecks have it.

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