Scot To Be Invited

In the towns

July 28, 1991

Aberdeen hopes to entertain the mayor of its Scottish namesake next year when the town celebrates 100 years of self-government granted bythe General Assembly.

The Aberdeen Centennial Committee said lastweek that it will invite Robert Robertson, Lord Provost of Aberdeen,Scotland, and his wife as honorees for the special birthday, June 3-6, 1992.

Aberdeen was named after the Scottish birthplace of "a Mr. Winston," the first stationmaster of the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad, who "settled in lower Harford and built his home alongthe railroad right of way" in 1835, according to C. Milton Wright's "Our Harford Heritage."

The town was incorporated in 1892, 22 years after the hamlets of Aberdeen, Hall's Cross Roads and Mechanicsville united to form a village.

The centennial invitation from Aberdeen Mayor George Englesson will be delivered next month by a St. Michael's couple, Dr. Thomas and Mary Craighead, who are traveling to Scotland in search of their ancestral roots.

Englesson will present theCraigheads with the invitation Tuesday during a ceremony at a concert by the Bel Air Community Band at Aberdeen Festival Park.


Bel Air town employees who have jobs in safety, security or health-related fields will be subject to random drug testing beginning Oct. 13.

The policy calls for disciplinary action for illegal drug use. The action can include firing employees who have beendetermined to be using illegal drugs.

The new policy, approved bythe five-member Board of Commissioners July 15, will affect about half to three-quarters of the town's 98 employees, said Joyce Oliver, town clerk. Other employees whose jobs do not fall into the "sensitive" category won't be affected, she said.

"For example, a records clerk who handles files in the police department, all truck drivers andheavy equipment operators will be subject to the random test," said Oliver. "But hopefully, we don't have any employees who are using drugs. There are no problems that we are aware of."

Oliver said the town has been requiring drug tests from job applicants for the past two years. He called the random testing of some employees an extension of the original policy.

Before the drug testing begins, Oliver said, employees who think they may have a drug problem can talk to her about a medical referral without fear of penalty, or they can seek medical treatment on their own.

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