Preview of 'Baltimore Portrait' exhibit set Wednesday at Artshowcase Gallery

ARTS NOTES

July 28, 1991|By Eric Siegel

In the spring of 1990, local photographers Tom Guidera III and J. Brough Schamp set up a vintage 1940s camera -- the kind with the heavy black cloth you set up on a tripod -- in Fells Point, Federal Hill, Druid Hill Park and in front of the old post office building on Calvert Street. They proceeded to take 150 pictures of any passersby who would agree to pose against a white backdrop.

The result of their efforts, "Baltimore Portrait," will have an opening preview exhibition Wednesday from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Artshowcase Gallery, 336 N. Charles St. The opening preview will benefit the Door, the private inner-city social services organization founded and directed by the Rev. Joe Ehrmann, the former Baltimore Colts defensive lineman.

The exhibit of 28 photos, produced in conjunction with the University of Maryland Baltimore County's Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery, will be at the Artshowcase Gallery through Saturday. Gallery hours are 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. The show will open at the Maryland Chamber of Commerce in Annapolis Sept. 12, where it will stay through December.

Tickets to Wednesday's opening -- which will include music and refreshments -- are $20 in advance and $25 the night of the benefit.

For more information, call 528-1236.

Eight artists' work

Another opening reception -- this one for an exhibition highlighting the works of eight studio artists in residence at the city-run School 33 Art Center -- will be held Tuesday from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

The exhibit will feature paintings by Nicholas Corrin, Diane Kuthy, Scott Ponemone, Alexandra Semionova and Murray Taylor; photography by Michela Caudill; and sculpture by John Hayes and Helen Sharkey.

The exhibit at the center at 1427 Light St. will run through Aug. 23. Hours are Tuesdays to Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

For more information, call 396-4641.

Grant to art museum

The Baltimore Museum of Art has received $225,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support a traveling exhibition to examine the impact of political, intellectual and aesthetic values on 19th century American culture. The exhibit, "Classical Taste in America, 1800-'40," will open at the BMA in June 1993.

The money -- which includes $125,000 in an outright grant and $100,000 in matching funds -- is part of $5.7 million in new grants awarded by the NEH to 37 cultural organizations in 18 states.

Fellowships awarded

Two Baltimore visual artists -- photographer Mark Harrell and sculptor Mark Sherwin -- are among 20 recipients of $5,000 fellowships from the Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation for 1991.

The fellowships, given to those who had not yet received national awards, were selected from 1,374 applicants, 705 in sculpture and 669 in photography. The applicants represented seven states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Next year, the Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation will again award up to 20 $5,000 visual arts fellowships, this time in painting and works on paper. Applications will be available in September.

For more information, call 539-6656.

Dance as therapy

Kinetics Dance Theatre is inaugurating a new weekly program in the fall for children ages 2-4 with developmental disabilities.

The program, "Therapeutic Music and Movement," is designed to encourage children to motivate themselves and interact with others using music and specially designed patterns. Two 45-minute sessions will be offered Thursdays at the theater at 8510 High Ridge Road, Ellicott City, beginning Sept. 12.

The cost of the program, which will run through June, is $56. In-person registration will be held Aug. 31 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Ellicott City studio and Sept. 7 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Columbia studio at 9200 Old Annapolis Road.

For more information, call 461-9907 or 740-9141.

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