Workers Snap Up Whatever Jobs They Can Find

July 17, 1991|By Greg Tasker | Greg Tasker,Staff writer

WESTMINSTER — Beth Flanagan waits tables four days a week. And one week out of themonth she works in the office of an Eldersburg chiropractic office.

She found the job at the Bachman Valley Inn in Manchester by word of mouth. She snatched the chiropractic job through Elkins Services Inc., a Westminster-based temporary employment service.

"I've had fewer assignments through the agency this summer," saidthe 21-year-old Manchester resident. "Last summer I did a lot of clerical and receptionist work, stuff like that. The job with the chiropractor's office is the only assignment I've had so far."

Even so, the Frostburg State University senior counts herself among the lucky.She's happy to be working and saving money for college.

ChristineMcPherson hasn't found a job yet in her field.

The 23-year-old Westminster resident recently earned a psychology degree from the University of Maryland-Baltimore County.

She admits, though, that she hasn't been looking very hard. Instead, she has been working part timeas a residential counselor for the developmentally disabled and as an office clerk in a cardiologist's office, a job she found through Elkins Services.

"I need to find a full-time job," she said. "I'm starting to look. I see a lot of openings in counseling."

Younger students like Jeremy Stoner and Shelly Buchanan had a tougher time finding even part-time jobs this summer.

Jeremy applied at several Westminster businesses, such as retail and grocery stores, but couldn't find anything.

So, the 16-year-old returned to his job as a busboyat McDaniel's Restaurant in Westminster, a position he held the previous summer.

"A lot of places told me they already hired for the summer," the Westminster High School senior said. "I couldn't find anything. Since I worked at McDaniel's last summer, I went back."

Jeremy works evenings at the restaurant and uses his money to help pay for car expenses, like gas and insurance. He also is trying to save money for college.

Fourteen-year-old Shelly is baby-sitting and selling snow cones. She applied for jobs at restaurants but wasn't hired.

"It's been tough," she said.

The Westminster High sophomore, though, enjoys spending her afternoons and some evenings selling snow cones from a stand at the corner of West Main and Bond streets. Most of her customers are children.

"I'm using whatever I can make thissummer for a car," she said.

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