R.A. Wiglesworth, lawyer, businessman

July 16, 1991

Reginald A. Wiglesworth, 79, a retired labor lawyer and corporate official who owned three cleaning businesses, died early yesterday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center after a long illness.

A mass of Christian burial will be offered at 10 a.m. tomorrow at St. Pius X Roman Catholic Church, 6428 York Road.

Mr. Wiglesworth lived on Oxford Road in Stoneleigh. At his death, he was the owner of two dry cleaning businesses, Anneslie Tailor Inc. and the Cleaner Cleaners, with shops in Towson and Cockeysville. He also owned the Maryland Carpet Care Corp., which specialized in office and commercial carpet cleaning in the Baltimore-Washington area.

He retired in 1976 as corporate secretary, credit manager and head of labor relations for Emeco Industries in Hanover, Pa. He had been with the office furniture manufacturer for nearly 20 years and had helped it acquire two other businesses.

In the 1960s, he was a federal arbitrator in labor disputes and an adviser on labor law to Robert F. Kennedy when he was attorney general.

He began practicing law in Baltimore after graduating in 1953 from the Mount Vernon School of Law, which later merged with the University of Baltimore.

Before becoming a lawyer, he had worked for the Crown Cork and Seal Co., where he was export credit

manager and manager of sales administration.

Born in Baltimore, he was a graduate of Loyola High School and attended Loyola College before beginning his law studies.

During World War II, he served in the Army and was a sergeant major at European headquarters.

Survivors include his wife, the former Janice Peppler; three sons, Patrick M. Wiglesworth and Robert W. Wiglesworth, both of Towson, and Michael B. Wiglesworth of Philadelphia; a sister, Margaret Lee of Catonsville, three grandchildren and a great-granddaughter.

The family suggested that memorial contributions could be made to the American Cancer Society.

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