Here is how members of Maryland's delegation on Capitol...

Votes in Congress

July 14, 1991|By Roll Call Report Syndicate

Here is how members of Maryland's delegation on Capitol Hill were recorded on important roll-call votes last week:

YES N: NO X: NOT VOTING

HOUSE: TRADE WITH CHINA

The House voted 223-204 to keep China from retaining most-favored-nation trade status as requested by President Bush. The House then extended MFN to Beijing for another year (below) with conditions opposed by the president.

Favored trade status entitles exporters to the lowest U.S. tariffs. Communist governments receive it only with congressional approval. MFN status for China has been losing support on Capitol Hill since the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre.

A yes vote opposed MFN renewal for China as requested by the White House.

%Y N X Member Y N X Member

N * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

* N * Byron, Beverly B., D-6th

Y * * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

* N * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

Y * * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

* N * McMillen, Tom, D-4th

Y * * Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

Y * * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

HOUSE: CONDITIONS FOR CHINA

The House voted 313-112 to renew trade privileges for China with conditions designed to make it less of a police state. To keep most-favored-nation status, China within a year must make major human rights and democratic reforms. The measure (HR 2212) became the House position on trade with Beijing and was sent to the Senate.

A yes vote was to make China's MFN status conditional on sweeping internal reforms.

Y N X Member Y N X Member

* * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

Y * * Byron, Beverly B., D-6th

Y * * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

Y * * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

Y * * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

Y * * McMillen, Tom, D-4th

Y * * Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

Y * * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

SENATE: TO PASS CRIME BILL

By a 71-26 vote, the Senate sent an anti-crime bill (S 1241) to the House. In part, the bill sets a federal death penalty for 51 offenses, limits federal appeals by state death row inmates, authorizes new prisons for drug offenders and the use of closed military bases as "boot camp" prisons, eases the exclusionary rule for admitting illegally seized evidence, outlaws most semiautomatic assault weapons and imposes handgun controls.

The bill proposes spending $3.3 billion, including $1 billion for state and local law enforcement. But appropriations are likely to fall far short of those goals, indicating that the bill promises much more in the way of crime fighting than Congress can deliver.

;/ A yes vote was to pass the 1991 crime bill.

Y N X Member Y N X Member

* * Mikulski, Barbara A., D

Y * * Sarbanes, Paul S., D

SENATE: GUN CONTROL

By a 67-32 vote, the Senate approved a five-day wait on handgun purchases, with sellers using the time to check prospective buyers for criminal records. After 30 months the mandatory delay could be removed from law, if the Justice Department has implemented an efficient nationwide system of instant computerized background checks. Added to S 1241 (above), the provision must be reconciled with House "Brady bill" language setting a seven-day wait on handgun purchases.

A yes vote supported handgun control.

Y N X Member Y N X Member

* * Mikulski, Barbara A., D

Y * * Sarbanes, Paul S., D

SENATE: POLICE RIGHTS

By a 55-43 vote, the Senate rejected an amendment to make a federal "bill of rights" for local police officers voluntary rather than mandatory. The vote came during debate on the 1991 crime bill (above). Certain rights, such as access to counsel, would be assured for officers subjected to internal disciplinary proceedings of a non-criminal nature.

A yes vote supported a voluntary rather than mandatory police officers' bill of rights.

Y N X Member Y N X Member

N * Mikulski, Barbara A., D

* N * Sarbanes, Paul S., D

SENATE: TO SAVE SUPERCOLLIDER

By a 62-37 vote, the Senate tabled, or killed, an amendment to deny funding for the superconducting supercollider project in Texas. The vote occurred as the Senate sent an Energy Department appropriations bill (HR 2427) to conference with the House. The bill contains $508 million for continued development of the 54-mile circular tunnel in which high-speed collisions of electrons could yield discoveries about the origin of matter. Since it was launched in 1988, the project's estimated cost has more than tripled to over $10 billion.

9- A yes vote was to fund the supercollider.

N X Member Y N X Member

* * Mikulski, Barbara A., D

Y * * Sarbanes, Paul S., D

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