German plaque might fetch $325-$335

MARKET VALUE

July 14, 1991|By James G. McCollam | James G. McCollam,Copley News Service

Q: Enclosed is a picture of a plaque. It is marked with a castle and the name Mettlach. Underneath are the initials "V.B." and "2622." We have researched it in the books under Mettlach with no results. If you can help, I will be grateful.

A: Your plaque was made in Mettlach, Germany, by Villeroy & Boch in the late 1800s. It's a choice collectible and would probably sell for about $325 to $335.

Q: This mark is on the bottom of my antique soup tureen with matching ladle. It is decorated with an Oriental design in blue, orange 10l and green. It is 14 inches in diameter. Can you tell me anything about its origin and value?

A: Your tureen is Mason's Patent Ironstone made in Lane Delph, England, between 1830 and 1845. It's a valuable piece, worth between $330 and $400.

Q: We have a small porcelain figurine of a little girl putting on a pair of gloves. It is marked "The New Gloves" and "Goldscheider" and "Made in Austria." Can you evaluate this and estimate when it was made?

A: Your figurine was made in Vienna about 1930, shortly before the company moved to Trenton, N.J. Goldscheider figurines are very popular with collectors; this one would probably sell for $500 to $600.

Q: I have a World War II poster for Defense Bonds & Stamps. It depicts a pilot saying, "You buy 'em -- we'll fly 'em!" It measures 14 by 10 inches. Can you tell if this is very valuable?

A: Your poster dates back to the 1940s, of course; it would probably sell for close to $100 in good condition.

Send your questions about antiques with picture(s), a detailed description, a stamped, self-addressed envelope and $1 per item to James G. McCollam, P.O. Box 1087, Notre Dame, Ind. 46556. All questions will be answered; published pictures cannot be returned. Mr. McCollam is a member of the Antique Appraisers Association of America.

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