Artshowcase ensconced in Charles Street home


July 12, 1991|By Eric Adams


336 N. Charles St.

Continuing to market and exhibit the works of exclusively Maryland artists, Artshowcase now operates out of a new, permanent home on North Charles Street (formerly Dalsheimer's). Using a unique computerized registry with 1,000 slides from 100 artists, Artshowcase provides to businesses and the public access to artworks based on the client's needs, as selected through 11 indexing categories, including subject, medium and placement area.

The major space of the 2,500-square-foot gallery will be devoted to a new show each month, and in a smaller space there will be a continuing, rotating show by Artshowcase members, who each pay $125 a year membership after being interviewed and selected by gallery owner James Dockery.

Following the current group show (though July 31), the gallery closes for renovations during August. It reopens Sept. 5 with "Raoul Middleman's Pastels" and "Gladys Goldstein's Acrylics/Paperworks." Call 783-0007.


Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, Constitution Avenue and Greenfield Street, Annapolis. "The World Turned Upside Down."

With a title taken from a tune played by the British Army after their surrender at Yorktown in 1781, this exhibit (through Aug. 10) examines how artists try to make sense out of chaos by extracting or creating meaning from apparently disparate elements. In the words of gallery curator David Tannous, "These works show a gleeful interest in seeing what happens when one way of doing things comes up against another."

Sometimes the elements are combined as collages, like the panoramic black-and-white photographic images of Gayle Rothschild, and sometimes the disparities are presented internally, like the oil on canvas paintings of Patricia Helsing, particularly "Envy and Avarice," in which a plain gray metal chair confronts an ornate Louis XVI armchair. The other artists presented are Judy Goodkind, Cassandra Kabler, Laurie Marshall and Peg Swartout. A reception this evening at 5 p.m., with remarks by the curator at 7 p.m., opens the show. Call 263-5544 or 269-1087.

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